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Oracle vs. Sybase

Hello,

I would like to know differencies between Oracle/Sybase, pro and con. Can you write some notes why to prefer Oracle?

Thanks for response
David
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There's a magic word: Google.
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I tried it, but there is not much info... Many links reference e.g. this page http://www.rocket99.com/sybase/syb_vs_ora.html But there is no pro and con for using Oracle or Sybase...
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I suggest you take remedial Google training.
Code:
DBMS - November 1996 - Comparison SummaryIn 1991 I performed a thorough evaluation and comparison of the four major DBMSs at the time: Informix, Ingres, Oracle, and Sybase. This comparison was done ...
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Did you tried some of the links? What informative value they carry or if they work at all?

Maybe I did express it wrong... I appreciate if you write your opinion or experiencies instead of offer google links

Many thanks

David
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I would say from past experience with Sybase the big difference is the way both do locking. Sybase (and sqlserver) have handled concurrency by locking records to prevent dirty reads (which they can allow if you want better performance). So writers have to wait for readers and readers have to wait for writers.

Oracle uses a multi versioning system where it can hold multiple copies of the data so that each session sees the data as it was when the transaction started (i.e. you get a consistent view of data at a point in time ). Because you have multiple copies of data readers dont wait for writers and writers dont wait for readers, only writers writing to the same record will wait for other writers.

I personally prefer the Oracle way even though it means extra overhead (you usually find simple single user benchmarks run quicker on Sybase/sqlserver than Oracle) you always get a consistent view of the data. The advantage of the Oracle way is also you very rarely get locking issues (no automatic escalation of locks to table level for example).

The other key difference is that generally Sybase/sqlserver are easier to learn though conversly you can do a lot more tweaking with Oracle if you know what your doing.


Alan
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In addition to AlanP's post :

If you have to choose between Sybase and Oracle, I consider Sybase as a declining DBMS whereas Oracle is very widely used, has a strong official support and a wide and active community (asktom, experts' blogs, forums...).

If you want a Sybase-like DBMS, then choose SQL Server instead, for IMO it has a much more brilliant future than Sybase.

Just my 2 cents

rbaraer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanP
Oracle uses a multi versioning system where it can hold multiple copies of the data so that each session sees the data as it was when the transaction started
This is very interesting to know. How do other servers handle concurrent requests? Primarily interested in Ingres, MySQL, IBM DB2 and SAP DB, but if you know how others handle it, please tell as well
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Most other databases dont do multiversioning but instead rely on locking. Thus they lock data preventing others from reading it until the transaction commits (some allow dirty reads where you read uncommited data but this means you cant guarantee your query is returning referentially correct data). This means queries always return committed data BUT readers are blocked until writers finish their transactions. This means you can get serious locking issues on a heavily used database where queries can hang for long periods of time waiting for big transactions to finish. It also means you cant guarentee referential integrity for your query results as small transactions could mean a large query is basically showing you the data as it was at the start plus any changes which occur during the running of the query i.e. your results are not a snapshot in time but the data as it was during the time your query was running which maybe significant.

Alan
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David, when you find arguments why buy oracle, then visit regional Oracle office. Responsible sales manager you provide lot of materials why.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanP
Most other databases dont do multiversioning but instead rely on locking.
Which ones?

Oracle (and Oracle's rdb formerly known as rdb/VMS), Firebird, Postgres use MVCC. The new storage engine for MySQL (Vulcan) also uses MVCC (Surprise! It was developed by the chief Firebird architect ).
I think even the most recent version of SQL Server can be run in MVCC mode.
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Typo by shammat there i think, new MySQL engine is called Falcon not Vulcan (which was the project name for the next generation SMP-capable Firebird).
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aschk
Typo by shammat there i think, new MySQL engine is called Falcon not Vulcan (which was the project name for the next generation SMP-capable Firebird).
Yes of course I meant Falcon.
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Btw:
here is a nice description of MVCC and DBMS that use it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multive...rrency_control
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btw. PostgreSQL also uses MVCC.
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