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  1. #1
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    Unanswered: NEW SQL Server Release`

    Check this out
    this is the replacement for MSDE 2000

    SQL Server 2005 Express Edition

    Top 10 cool things about SQL Server Express Edition

    SQL Server Express Books Online

    by the way if you follow the first link, you will find a pretty accurate photo of rdjabarov...

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruprect
    Check this out
    you will find a pretty accurate photo of rdjabarov...
    Looks pretty nice and decent just like the Express Edition. Where he's from by the way, USA!!

  3. #3
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    Hey, you see what you started, Scott??? And YOU KNOW I don't look like this!.. And where the h*** did you get 2005 Express??? In Ala-freaking-bama?
    "The data in a record depends on the Key to the record, the Whole Key, and
    nothing but the Key, so help me Codd."

  4. #4
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    Hey now, I'm from Ala-freaking-bama

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdjabarov
    Hey, you see what you started, Scott??? And YOU KNOW I don't look like this!.. And where the h*** did you get 2005 Express??? In Ala-freaking-bama?

    i'm just kidding
    but on further reflection he kind of looks like fabian pascal.
    Pat can verify that for us because as we all know, he's fabian's best friend.

  6. #6
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    Do you really believe that I think that way?..Well, I DO love Texas, but I am ready for a change (ideally would be to move without my kids knowing where to )
    "The data in a record depends on the Key to the record, the Whole Key, and
    nothing but the Key, so help me Codd."

  7. #7
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    Anyone else think that CLR is a bunch of nonsense?
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Kaiser
    Anyone else think that CLR is a bunch of nonsense?
    I think it's VERY neat. I also think that this will force some hard core production DBA's to have a hard look at themselves and see if the career they've chosen is what they want to continue pursuing. Personally, I am happy with a definition that is given to me, - hybrid DBA! And the direction the job description is taking is where I am at now.
    "The data in a record depends on the Key to the record, the Whole Key, and
    nothing but the Key, so help me Codd."

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruprect
    Pat can verify that for us because as we all know, he's fabian's best friend.
    It's good to be loved, isn't it? Actually, I've never met Fabian in person, or even seen a picture from a reliable source, so I'm no authority there. It's hard to imagine that I've never seen anyone that loves me so, isn't it?

    -PatP

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Kaiser
    Anyone else think that CLR is a bunch of nonsense?
    Not really, I think that the CLR brings a lot of interesting benefits, but it brings some new risks in the baggage with it.

    The benefits are basically the ones that UCSD promised with the p-machine and Java didn't quite deliver with their virtual machine. A standard, more or less hardware independant virtual machine. One code base for many platforms. One target for many compilers, which allows much better tools to evolve because the economies of scale kick in much sooner.

    The big risks seem to be that once something makes it into the runtime, who will ensure that it makes sense for it to stay there as it evolves. Many things that make perfect sense on the desktop (or even handheld) are a positive liability on a server!

    It is a two edged sword. It brings many benefits, but at a significant cost.

    -PatP

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdjabarov
    I think it's VERY neat.
    Why? And yes, PROD DBA's who sit there waiting for an alert...sure...but someones got to do that...and I'm glad it's not me...not sure if they even know what a sproc is...let alone a trigger...

    And what can you do with "External Procedures" (CLR) that you can't do with T-SQL or it's extensions?

    CLR is just more overhead....

    And I'd love to see what they mean by Extensive XML support....

    What? Did they add Relational extenders to XML?
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  12. #12
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    Well, I've run to the rescue of "External Procedures" via sp_oaxxx. You're write, the same thing can be accomplished by T-SQL, but the final choice is based on many factors. I prefer to use a tool for a task that is designed to do that task. Of course I can create a file using T-SQL, but if there is a better way to do the same thing (Scripting.FileSystemObject) I'd pick that one.
    "The data in a record depends on the Key to the record, the Whole Key, and
    nothing but the Key, so help me Codd."

  13. #13
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    i like the concept and intent of the Common Language Runtime.
    now you can develop in your native language without having to learn an entirely new discipline.
    standardization is a good thing. it allows developers to get back to the act of developing logic instead of all of these funky diversions that we have to endure.
    case in point ---dbforums.com
    what percent of all of the questions raised here are by dba's to dba's about dba stuff.
    most of them are actually developers trying to reinvent the wheel in a entirely new discipline (T-sql SQL Server etc..). by giving them a internal wrapper for all of their "stuff" they can truly screw everything up and then call us "The Consultant" to fix it (for a fee of course)

  14. #14
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    I think Pat summed it up pretty well. There are some things that the CLR will just do better. There's also a LOT of risk if it's used wrong. The XML thing actually worries me more then the CLR though. It's harking back to the days of hierarchial design and promising "extensibility". I have a feeling we'll end up regretting the degradation of a relational environment to cater to the desires of a shortcut "extend into anything without considering the consequences" world. Oh well.....rant off.
    MeanOldDBA
    derrickleggett@hotmail.com
    When life gives you a lemon, fire the DBA.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruprect
    i like the concept and intent of the Common Language Runtime.
    now you can develop in your native language without having to learn an entirely new discipline.
    standardization is a good thing. it allows developers to get back to the act of developing logic instead of all of these funky diversions that we have to endure.
    case in point ---dbforums.com
    what percent of all of the questions raised here are by dba's to dba's about dba stuff.
    most of them are actually developers trying to reinvent the wheel in a entirely new discipline (T-sql SQL Server etc..). by giving them a internal wrapper for all of their "stuff" they can truly screw everything up and then call us "The Consultant" to fix it (for a fee of course)
    Right on, man, right on!
    "The data in a record depends on the Key to the record, the Whole Key, and
    nothing but the Key, so help me Codd."

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