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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    1

    Question Unanswered: What Type of Database is .dat and .idx ?

    Hi there!

    I have an old database I can't read. It must be originated in the late 80s.
    It's not dbase, foxpro, paradox, clarion, vict, volgaDB or something else Degisy Database Workshop can open.
    I assume it's a C-ISAM database.

    I attached two files (zipped) as a sample.

    Could anyone tell me what a database format they have and how I can read them?

    Thanks a lot,
    Bernhard Kiselka
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Sunny Florida
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    121
    It is ISAM. Is the app written in CET BASIC?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Frankfurt am Main
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    Googeln nach den Begriffen ".DAT" und ".IDX" brachte einige Hinweise zutage, u.a. einen auf einen Beitrag in diesem Forum:

    http://www.dbforums.com/t1003147.html

    Seems to be CMEDS .... isn't it? Mit einer Liste von Krankenkassen ...


    MfG,
    L. Willms

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Sunny Florida
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    121
    We used to use a D-ISAM format. I tried the ODBC drive we wrote for it to check if I could read these files. It didn't work out. More likely than not, you will need an export util written by a programmer to get the data out to txt format.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Frankfurt am Main
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    The CET BASIC command line utilities BCOPY and BLIST don't find any sensible information in the KASSEN.DAT

    So it must be something else.

    Yours,
    L. Willms

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Sunny Florida
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    This is what I found too! Blist just shows a bunch of trash. Our ODBC driver sees the table but craps out trying to read it. Do you have the voc file for this table?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Sunny Florida
    Posts
    121
    Nevermind about voc. If it cant be blisted then I won't be able to bcopy it in to our voc file. You may want to take a look in the application that uses this data. I would hope that there would be an export util. We had to write one that spit the data out in comma delimited text files.

    If this doesn't exist then investigate the reporting side of the app. If it has an ad-hoc report writer like Access32 (not MS Access) You might be able to use that. This would be a difficult task and would involve a lot of work.

    It would really help if you could tell use what the app was written in.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Sussex, England
    Posts
    404

    .Dat and .IDX

    I've come across this combination before, but I thought it was dbase III with the .idx files being the index tables.

    If you can't open these with paradox or a dbase tool then I would have thought it was worth trying to read the .dat files with Access (I've done this with info that came on a disk with nothing but .dat and .idx files).

    Good luck.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1
    I have kind of the same problem with a db - the program that used to access the data (both .DAT and .IDX files) was written in COBOL, but that is now defunked (company who developed it went bust and cannot get hold of the programmer!) and I need to transfer all the data to a new db with a VB front end - Any ideas anyone???

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Sunny Florida
    Posts
    121
    Send a small one (dat and idx) to jfogel_34683@yahoo.com. I may not be able to tell you what it is, but I can tell you what it is not.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1
    Did someone find out what type of database are these files?

    I have some files and the file format seems similar to this attached.

    I need a tool to open the tables. hope someone could help me

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    2

    Wink New here

    Love the site already!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    2
    The database is actually for a camera software for surveillance! Very popular for the format!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by SNA400 View Post
    I have kind of the same problem with a db - the program that used to access the data (both .DAT and .IDX files) was written in COBOL, but that is now defunked (company who developed it went bust and cannot get hold of the programmer!) and I need to transfer all the data to a new db with a VB front end - Any ideas anyone???
    I had that problem back in the 80s as well, and wrote a program to get the data out and import it to a .dbf file. I compiled it using Clipper S87 with some C functions. I have been going through my old stuff and if I can find it I will upload it here in a compressed file. If I find the source I will send it too, but that was some 20 years ago.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by OldTimeCoder View Post
    I had that problem back in the 80s as well, and wrote a program to get the data out and import it to a .dbf file. I compiled it using Clipper S87 with some C functions. I have been going through my old stuff and if I can find it I will upload it here in a compressed file. If I find the source I will send it too, but that was some 20 years ago.
    I did the same thing too.

    To read the data file I used a hex editor to find the data structure, used dbase to create the data base and using the data structure created a clipper program to read in the data, parse each line, separate the fields, and insert the resulting data into a .dbf. The IDX or index file really was easy by looking at the reports generated and searches.

    I looked on my old DOS stuff and could not find the program I created although I did find all the data that I created the program for.

    Good luck.

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