Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    France
    Posts
    754

    Unanswered: Oracle 9i or 10g ?

    Hello everyone,

    As some of you already know, I'm currently in development phase, and we should go in production within a few months. For the last 10 months, I've been learning Oracle on 9i, and I still have MANY MANY things to learn... My question is : should I change to 10g now, or continue with 9i, know it well, and then begin to have a look at 10g for future migration ? I read that 10g was easier to administrate & tune, is that right ? Does what is true with 9i remain true with 10g ? Is 10g stable enough in your opinion ? Is it really more performant ? Would 9i be cheaper by now ?

    Regards,

    RBARAER

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    369

    stick with 9i

    Most companies are still way behind in Oracle releases in fact 90% are still running Oracle 8i/9i shops. Upgrades will occur over the next several years but for the meantime focus on 8i/9i.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    5,516
    Provided Answers: 1
    I disagree. If you already had a production system running on Oracle9i I'd suggest you delay migration to 10g until after the new release of your application is safely in production. However, I understand yours is a brand-new installation; in that case I don't see any point in "sticking with 9i" because there's nothing to stick with. 10g may not be as "stable" as 9i but with proper stress testing your chances to hit a critical issue will probably be about the same.

    Don't forget license prices, too. I tend to think that installing 9i and then migrating to 10g will be more expensive than purchasing 10g license(s) outright.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    369

    test legacy applications with Oracle 10G

    I again agree to disagree with the previous poster. The problem is you really need to test your applications with 10G to ensure that they will work with the new release. 10G is a lot different than 9i or 8i for that matter. If you have a lot of old applications they may not work with 10G. However if you test successfully and if the system is a new server than I would agree to move to 10G rather than 9i.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    145
    Based on my experience, unless database has special requirements (7x24 and outage is premium, large amount of storage, etc), database upgrade is a small portion of upgrade conversion process. If you are fair ways down the development, I would not switch the database version.

    Most time is spent on verification/validation of application functioning with new version of database (usually leary users).

    I would evalute the development tools you are using and their stability/supportability with the database version. Last thing you want is to have problem with application and vendor (be it development tool or application) point the database version as the primary culprit.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Posts
    1,137
    As your application hasnt gone into production and if I am right you are developing it (?) then definitely go for 10g. Otherwise you will spend lots of time and resources developing, tuning and testing against 9i and then have to repeat the whole thing for 10g (aswell as having to schedule downtime). The other thing in 10g favour is that you should get better performance out of it aswell as it being easier to tune.

    If you are using an older application developed outside then 9i might be better especially if you dont have good testing resource and if the app vendor hasnt certified it for 10g.

    Alan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    France
    Posts
    754
    OK, so, since I'm still in dev, with no prod environment, and for now not too many apps to test & validate on 10g, I think I'll switch my devs to 10g. However, I'll continue to post questions about 9i, because I won't do the switch before a few weeks (awaiting a brand new machine ). As you suggested, Alan, I think I will postpone further tuning to the switch to 10g.

    Thanks to all of you !

    Regards,

    RBARAER

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Temple University
    Posts
    36

    Cool

    The benefit of going with 10G now, is that it will be supported for a longer period of time. You will not be forced into an upgrade in 2-3 years down the road, you can wait for the 5 year cycle.

    Going to 10G now may be a little extra work up front, but you save a ton of backend work such as testing both releases, tuning both releases, etc.

    HTH
    Peter

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Desk, slightly south of keyboard
    Posts
    697
    Hi,

    There are places out there still running seven. They created an instance for a job, the job never changed, the systems still run well.

    My customers choose their own DB version to run my app, I've only just started seeing them mention 9. They choose stability first.

    Anyone remember the big security scares in 9, how many months/years was that after 9 was released?

    "Can't break it" was the advert. "Broke it" was the reply.

    You've probably gathered that I'm biased towards the known quantity, better the devil you know sort of thing. To be honest, this is an age old question... as what point should I move upwards?

    Cheers
    Bill
    Please don't email me directly with questions. I've probably just got home from the pub and cannot guarantee the sanity of my answers. In fact, I can't believe I actually made it home.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Where the Surf Meets the Turf @Del Mar, CA
    Posts
    7,776
    Provided Answers: 1
    My choice is 10g without any hesitation, because with the length of the deployment schedule the testing will uncover any Oracle bugs.
    IMO, the bugs in Oracle are typically in new features.
    If you don't code to use the bleeding edge technology features, you'll have smooth sailing.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    France
    Posts
    754
    Thank you everyone for your advice ! I'll switch to 10g as soon as I can.

    Best Regards,

    RBARAER

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •