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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    1,312

    Unanswered: Print Preview Problem

    I have a few newer systems (XP Pro) and when I show a report in Print Preview, I get 'There isn't enough free memory to update the display. Close unneeded programs and try again'. It was a problem with Access 97 but it only effected us when you displayed the report in Fit mode instead of 100% or less. Two questions, how do I fix the free memory issue (nothing else is running on the system except Access and background services). And since I converted to Access XP the default Print Preview mode is Fit and the reports blow up and close. So is there a way to tell Access to open the report in Preview mode 100% or 75% and not Fit?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    108
    I realize this is a very old post, but I have been searching for a resolution to this problem and just found what solved the problem for me.

    First off, I am using Vista, and If I had code set to "preview" the report, it wouldnt even open the report, so I changed to "viewreport" and it started giving me the "there isn't enough memory to update the display"

    I found my problem went away when I changed the default printer in vista...
    Yep just control panel > printers > and changed which printer was the default. My normal default printer was "not available" since I was not at work and on the network. I changed the default printer to the XPS Document Writer and I have not gotten the error in hours !

    Just posting, in case anyone else looking and the other fixes did not fix their problem either...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia USA
    Posts
    2,763
    Provided Answers: 19
    As you've found out, a quirk of Access is that you cannot open a report, even for previewing, unless there is a printer available and set as the Default Printer. Using the XPS Document Writer, as you've done, or the Office Documnent Image Writer, is a workaround.

    Linq ;0)>
    Hope this helps!

    The problem with making anything foolproof...is that fools are so darn ingenious!

    All posts/responses based on Access 2003/2007

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