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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    104

    Unanswered: Microsoft Script Debugger

    Hello. I have WinXP Pro with IIS 5.1 installed on my PC. I write ASP applications and I test them locally. When I was reading a book about ASP it suggested me the "Microsoft Script Debugger" to debug my ASP applications. To do this I had to check the "Enable ASP server-side script debugging" on IIS (In application folder click on configuration and then the debugging tab) and of course I had to have the "Microsoft Script Debugger" (MSD). I adjusted the IIS but because I didn't have the MSD (winXP did not have it) I downloaded from the internet. The problem is that the MSD works only with Internet Explorer (is attached to it as the book write) and not with ASP applications.That is to say with client and not with server side script (it is not attached to IIS but only to IE). Becuase that when I run a page from an ASP application the MSD appear only the HTML result to debug (IE) and not the .asp page with the source script (ASP).What is wrong?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    104

    I found it!

    The problem is that the MSD is not working under Win XP SP2. Since I have updated my machine with SP2 from SP1 the MSD failed. Uh..Sorry Microsoft but we caught you.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,032
    The problem is that the MSD works only with Internet Explorer (is attached to it as the book write) and not with ASP applications.That is to say with client and not with server side script (it is not attached to IIS but only to IE).
    Well for classic, server-side VBScript (i.e. ASP) Response.Write's are a good way to do some debugging to see if variables or recordset fields really contain the information you think they should.

    For example in a login page where the user's access level is assigned to a session variable one could do something like the following:
    Response.Write objRST("UserName") & "<br>"
    Response.Write objRST("UserPassword") & "<br>"
    Response.Write objRST("UserAccess") & "<br>"
    Response.Flush
    Response.End

    The second of the last line above is often required if buffering is set on (Response.Buffer = True) which it perhaps usually would be.
    The last line above is optional for if you need to stop the code from running after that point (i.e. to avoid a page redirect or something).
    J. Paul Schmidt, Freelance Web and Database Developer
    www.Bullschmidt.com
    Access Database Sample, Web Database Sample, ASP Design Tips

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