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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    3

    Unanswered: Upper limit for SQL Server?

    I was wondering what more experienced DBAs have observed with regard to the capacity of a MSSQL DB. Is there an upper threshold of rows where performance becomes unacceptable? I have a fairly slow, but constant input rate of approximately 2,000 rows every 60 seconds or so (that is a little high, but I'm interested in worse case scenario here). That is up 172,800 rows a day. (I'm being overly pessimistic here.) We'd like to be able to keep all of this around as long as possible.

    Or would a more heavy duty DB be in order for these sorts of data rates?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
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    Provided Answers: 1
    Who told you SQL Server wasn't a heavy-duty DB?
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Jersey
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    10,322
    33 transaction a second...not too bad...depends on your hardware and how the app is constructed...and your hardware

    What kind of application is it?
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

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    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    364
    I have an app running on sql server that easily handles 400+ database transactions per second.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    Provided Answers: 11
    It will come down to the design of the database, and how good the indexes/statistics are. I have one system on 5 year old hardware, that serves up 300- 600 queries per second. Another system is only about 2 years old. Twice the ram, twice the CPUS, twice the CPU speed, and it starts to choke at 40 queries per second. Can you spot the table scan?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3
    It is a 3 tier .NET system responsible for up to fifty simultaneous users connected at any one time. Query performance is of the highest concern, but we need to be able to keep up with the aforementioned data rate. Windows has a reputation for being a "mickey mouse" server platform among my coworkers, so that is the bias I brought to this post. Hardware is dual Xeon 3.6's with 4GB of RAM I believe.

    I'm really just a total newbie at this stuff, so thats why I'm asking. Along the same lines, are there any essential books on the subject of SQL Server that a newbie should start with? I'd like to be able to maximize performance here. Thanks again!
    Last edited by antareus; 09-24-05 at 12:25.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
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    12,592
    Provided Answers: 1
    Anybody who thinks Windows is a "Mickey Mouse" platform is just plain "Goofy".

    Sorry, couldn't resist...
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    28
    Look at different OS. SQL can scale accordingly. Please check this Microsoft article
    http://support.microsoft.com/default...b;en-us;274750 for some useful info on this topic.

    SQL Server 2000 can manage memory automatically. Please make sure that you do not keep App server and Database on the same box. Books Online is better than buying any book (my personal opinion). SQL has enterprise manager, a UI tool for performing most of the database tasks.

    Quote Originally Posted by antareus
    It is a 3 tier .NET system responsible for up to fifty simultaneous users connected at any one time. Query performance is of the highest concern, but we need to be able to keep up with the aforementioned data rate. Windows has a reputation for being a "mickey mouse" server platform among my coworkers, so that is the bias I brought to this post. Hardware is dual Xeon 3.6's with 4GB of RAM I believe.

    I'm really just a total newbie at this stuff, so thats why I'm asking. Along the same lines, are there any essential books on the subject of SQL Server that a newbie should start with? I'd like to be able to maximize performance here. Thanks again!

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