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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    SW England
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    Unanswered: real easy newby Q: SQL server

    This Q is so easy I can't find the answer anywhere!
    Why is SQL Server called 'Server' ? I understand it is a lot more capable and robust than Access but where does 'server' come into it.
    I currently use ASP and Access for dynamic websites but it is time to move up a notch.
    Do I just buy SQL Server, make a database, upload it to the same place as before and hey presto?
    can I run lots of websites (on different domains and servers) from databases created with my single license standard edition?
    Thanks
    M

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,245
    Quote Originally Posted by darkmunk
    This Q is so easy I can't find the answer anywhere!
    Why is SQL Server called 'Server' ? I understand it is a lot more capable and robust than Access but where does 'server' come into it.
    I currently use ASP and Access for dynamic websites but it is time to move up a notch.
    Do I just buy SQL Server, make a database, upload it to the same place as before and hey presto?
    can I run lots of websites (on different domains and servers) from databases created with my single license standard edition?
    Thanks
    M
    MS SQL Server is a server-side RDBMS. That means you submit your query and all processing is handled server-side with the result set being sent to the client. With access, under most conditions, the processing is done client side with the data flowing over the network.

    As far as upgrading, there is an upgrade wizard. If all you are doing is storing data in tables, then the upgrade process can be quite straightforward. However, T-SQL (the data manipulation language, or DML, for SQL Server) is different from the DML fro Access. Specific syntax differences exist for many functions and features that are common in Access are sometimes not available in SQL (e.g. crosstab).

    It is very easy to run multiple databases (equating to distinct web sites) on a single SQL Server instance. Of course performance may degrade if each site is high-throughput, but you will have to evaluate your needs and requirements in light of your available resources.

    Regards,

    hmscott
    Have you hugged your backup today?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    SW England
    Posts
    102
    Thank you, sounds like the transition will be relatively painless.
    Still a bit confused tho'.
    My client's ISP can handle SQL Server 2000 so do I create a DB back here, then upload what? a db file like Access or an entire er... server?
    If i then make a db for a different client and upload to another server do I need to buy another license?
    With Access you just make databases and upload as many as you want to any complient server. I get the feeling this isn't so with SQL Server.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,245
    Quote Originally Posted by darkmunk
    My client's ISP can handle SQL Server 2000 so do I create a DB back here, then upload what? a db file like Access or an entire er... server?
    I've never managed a db through an ISP before. They should provide you with some sort of management interface; there are web-based front-ends for SQL management (tho' I have never used any). A lot depends on how the ISP is managing the SQL Server; do you have a dedicated SQL Instance? or are you sharing a Server with others? If dedicate, is the instance local to the web server? or is it on another machine altogether?

    Quote Originally Posted by darkmunk
    If i then make a db for a different client and upload to another server do I need to buy another license?
    License for what? SQL? It depends on what your ISP is providing to you/your client.

    Quote Originally Posted by dakmunk
    With Access you just make databases and upload as many as you want to any complient server. I get the feeling this isn't so with SQL Server.
    You're right, it is a bit different, tho' not overwhelmingly so. You create a database in SQL with the CREATE DATABASE statement. That creates logical and physical resources to hold the data. You then use CREATE TABLE statements to create the logical structures to contain the data. You then insert/manipulate data into the tables using data manipulation language (INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE).

    You could (potentially, depending on your ISP), create the SQL database on your local laptop, detach the database and upload the .mdf and .ldf files and then attach the files to the SQL instance. Not sure that this is how I would approach the problem, but it may work.


    Regards,

    hmscott
    Have you hugged your backup today?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    SW England
    Posts
    102

    Red face

    What?...
    I guess you guys have brains that work differently to mine.
    I am more confused than ever.
    do I get a GUI?
    do I create a discreet db file locally with a piece of software?
    do I upload the file?
    do I connect to it with a database connection string and make it do stuff.
    Will my client be happy?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,245
    Quote Originally Posted by darkmunk
    What?...
    I guess you guys have brains that work differently to mine.
    I am more confused than ever.
    do I get a GUI?
    do I create a discreet db file locally with a piece of software?
    do I upload the file?
    do I connect to it with a database connection string and make it do stuff.
    Will my client be happy?
    I really can't answere these questions as I have never managed a SQL instance provided by an ISP. These questions should be directed to your ISP support staff.

    Regards,

    hmscott
    Have you hugged your backup today?

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