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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    43

    Unanswered: Duplicate Values

    I am unable to save information due to duplicate values. I was wondering how do I allow duplicate values of a form.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    The Bottom of The Barrel
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    6,102
    Provided Answers: 1
    Read about Primary Keys in the Access help file.
    oh yeah... documentation... I have heard of that.

    *** What Do You Want In The MS Access Forum? ***

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    43

    Primary Keys

    Thank you for your reply Teddy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    43

    Duplicate Values

    Teddy or any,

    thanks for the information. I was wondering if you had a good example of the use of the primary key for me. I am new to access and appreciate the assistance.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    The Bottom of The Barrel
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    6,102
    Provided Answers: 1
    Did you read the help file?

    It would be greatly in your best interest to take a tutorial right now. Seriously, stop whatever you're doing and take a basic access tutorial. If you don't understand the concept of a primary key, I garauntee you're going to shoot yourself in the foot if you try to develop anything. It's not a bad thing if you don't know, I'm not trying to rip on you, but you NEED to learn about it right now. NOW.






    PS: Did I mention you should do this right at this moment?
    oh yeah... documentation... I have heard of that.

    *** What Do You Want In The MS Access Forum? ***

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    1,312
    I agree with Teddy, you should understand some basic Relational Database ideas before you begin developing a database. But I will give you an example of a primary key.

    A primary key is a field or fields in a table that uniquely identifies a row in the table. So for example, if you wanted a table with every American's name and address in it you would need to be able to identify a particular row (or person). An ideal primary key for your table would be the Social Security number. Everyone has a unique number that identifies him or her. If you have two people with the same number then you would have many problems.

    An example of a compound primary key (where more than one field is used to uniquely identify a row) might be if you were creating a table that listed all your available font sizes. If you have fonts Arial, Times New Roman, and Tahoma for example, and the font sizes are 12, 13 and 14, the primary key would be the font name and the size. Since you will have a table looking like:

    Arial--12
    Arial--13
    Arial--14
    Tahoma--12
    Tahoma--13
    Tahoma--14
    Times--12
    Times--13
    Times--14

    If you choose the font name as a primary key, you see there are three rows with each name. If you choose the size, the same problem exists. But, if you choose the combination of the two columns, you have a unique primary key.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    out on a limb
    Posts
    13,692
    Provided Answers: 59
    Also worth a read is Paul Litwin's tome reprinted on Rudy's site.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    43

    I appreciate the help

    I appreciate the help, and yes I did read the help files and understand relational database. I was just looking for some more examples to get a better grasp. Thanks for the help.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    43

    Paul Litwin

    Great article and thanks for the info

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