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Thread: Why Oracle ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Unanswered: Why Oracle ?

    I have a choice of working with either SQLServer or Oracle within my company. I need to advise them which way to go. I need to support a couple of hundred users in a mixed workload environment (OLTP, Batch & Reporting)
    The O/S will be Windows 2003 Server. My understanding is that Oracle is the better database technically but SQLServer is cheaper and easier to integrate with other MS technologies. My company will most likely buy into whatever technology will deliver value for money but also be secure and be able to scale.
    Any views gratefully received.

  2. #2
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    You should also consider MYSQL and Postgres; which are free & therefore return the most value.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by anacedent
    You should also consider MYSQL and Postgres; which are free & therefore return the most value.
    Yeah, but he also stated that it has to be secure and be able to scale.

    What is your position at this company, thedatabaseman ?

  4. #4
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    SQL Server Express is free, and can be scaled up to Enterprise Edition when your business grows.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
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  5. #5
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    The main consideration is what are you going to do? Is it a canned package that has database requirements? How heavy will the usage be? Is it mostly query or are there a lot of updates?

    Oracle is the most robust of all the databases and handles multiple readers and updaters very well. MySQL is a great product and is used on MANY, MANY web sites on the internet.

    I have used MySQL, Oracle, and SqlServer. If you are using a complex system with heavy updates then use Oracle. If it is a light weight vanilla system use MySQL. I personally have never been pleased with the reliability or performance of SqlServer. Other people will sing it's praises, but it has always left me cold.

    The price will depend on what you want to do and what the hardware is. Oracle and SqlServer are about the same cost for a 1-2 processer machine. Oracle gets much more costly as the number of processors goes up, but will deliver much better performance then SqlServer. MySql is free (open source) and can be downloaded from www.mysql.org
    Bill
    You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.

  6. #6
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    Both secure & scale are relative terms and again comes down to price/performance trade-offs.
    Yes, relatively speaking Oracle is more secure & will scale larger, but costs more.
    How secure is secure enough?
    How big will the DB actually get?
    For example weather.com migrated from Oracle to MYSQL.
    You can have it good, fast, & cheap; but you only get to pick which two are most important & then pay the price in the remaining dimension.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    9

    Cool

    I suggest your choice should also depend on

    • the OS platform used (here: Win 2003 points in favour of SQLServer, to my mind...)
    • system-wide integration (Active Directory, BizTalk, Mail...)
    • Application integration (SAP, Peoplesoft, CRM, SCM...)
    • Application profile (OLTP, DSS, Data Warehouse...)
    • performance expectations and requirements
    • availability requirements (HA, clustering)
    • application development requirements (Java, .NET, Portlets...)
    • service and support requirements
    • price for the platform selected (OS, #cpu, #users,...)


    There is no *best* database system. A database system is a (complex) backend that serves other applications' purposes. If you're aware of the purpose, the choice will be easier.

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