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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Los Angeles, CA
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    Unanswered: MS SQL Server vs MySQL question..

    I use MS profiler to run traces to diagnose issues/problems with any MS SQL Server database. Is there an equivalent tool when using MySQL database? What about Enterprise Manger and Query Analyzer? Is it fair to assume that the administrative tools available for MySQL will do the job that MS tools do for MS SQL Server with comparable ease?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Netherlands
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    I don't know of any Profiler-like applications for MySQL but I use SQLyog to administer my MySQL databases (http://www.webyog.com).

    In my opinion comparing MySQL to MS SQL Server is comparing a bycicle with a Mercedes. They both get you from A to B but that's the only fair comparison. MySQL is a nice database for small non-critical applications but it can't do halve the things that SQL Server can. So tools for MySQL won't do the same as the ones for SQL Server.

    Lex

    PS. Again, this is my own opinion on the matter. So feel free to contradict

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
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    20,002
    small non-critical applications? whoa

    have a look at some of the mysql customers, my friend, and you will see some fairly big, critical names

    craigslist, slashdot, technorati are small, non-critical?

    ticketmaster is small, non-critical?

    you've been buying the "open source can't be any good" comic books, haven't you

    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
    Buy my SitePoint book: Simply SQL

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Provided Answers: 54
    In terms of industry support, developer and dba tools, and more importantly vendor support, I think Microsoft SQL Server is the best bang for the buck available. The features available (many of them "out of the box" such as SQL Profiler, Enterprise Manager, Analysis Services, and Reporting Services) are more readily available and well understood than comparable tools for any product currently available, at any price.

    This doesn't mean that MySQL is a bad tool, and it emphatically does not mean that it isn't suitable for doing serious work. It does however mean that you need to find support from someone other than the vendor (MySQL AB), which gives you a very low cost of entry, but often a HUGE ongoing cost for the people you need to support the product. For large organizations that need people with "heavy firepower" to support their applications like the ones that R937 pointed out, the cost is irrelevant. They need to have folks that can handle the support on staff 24 by 365 anyway, so they have no additional cost of ownership.

    For most of us, the cost of the people needed to support the tools would exceed what the company makes. Many folks choose to live without the support, and hope that they never need it. That has proven to be a fatal assumption for a number of small (under $10 million per year gross revenue) businesses every year.

    Microsoft SQL Server isn't a "magic bullet". It won't solve every problem. I don't always recommend it, but for more than 80% of the business use that I see, MS-SQL is the best database tool for the job in my opinion.

    -PatP

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Netherlands
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    280
    Alright, alright, I take back some of the words I said about MySQL. It was after one o'clock at night when I wrote that post and I was feeling rebellious. I overstated the comparison and my humble opinion actually comes close to that of Pat's.

    I'm still not fully over the first impression I got when, years back, I learned of MySQL and did some research. I looked up the support for referential integrety and was horrified to read that, not only was that support at the time non-existing but it was stated that it was cumbersome and troublesome and you wouldn't need it.

    I tossed it aside and didn't look at it for a few years. When I re-researched it a few years later the support was added and I find the product most agreeable. But aside from the features it lacks in comparison to SQL Server (and Oracle and DB2 and Sybase and ...) I think the most crucial thing is the absence of a big vendor who is and feels responsible for the product. And that's what you need when your core business depends on it!

    For the record: I think I'm not biased when it comes to open source or even databases. Oracle is as good a database as Sybase or SQL Server. They all have their weaknesses and strong points (When's MS gonna give me function based idexes and a sequence generator!? ). MySQL has it's strongpoints and I will keep using it for the projects I think it is most suitable for.

    Lex

    PS. is that comic on the same shelve as the "Big commercial companies are all money grabbin' crooks thus open source is the solution for everything" comics?

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