Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    42

    Question Unanswered: I am gonna learn Oracle

    hi all
    i m new here and so i am to Oracle. i v already learnt SQL Server 2000 as a database designer. not done any projects though.
    i m gonna go into hardcore database line.
    what do u guys suggest?
    any comments will be appreciated....
    thanks
    cheers
    iinfi

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    2,713

    Cool


    You can read here and here how to become Oracle DBA.

    The person who says it can't be done should not interrupt the person doing it. -- Chinese proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    565
    Download Oracle 10g.
    Bookmark the documentation.

    I'm not sure where you should start by way of a tutorial, but you could try the Concepts Guide and see where that takes you. Tom Kyte's books are worth reading. For PL/SQL programming, Stephen Feuerstein's book is a good introduction, and Connor McDonald's "Mastering Oracle PL/SQL" is pretty good as well. (Oracle Database 10g PL/SQL Programming (Oracle Press) sucked IMHO.)
    Last edited by WilliamR; 05-01-06 at 19:51.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    DC Metro
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamR
    Download Oracle 10g.
    Bookmark the documentation.

    I'm not sure where you should start by way of a tutorial, but you could try the Concepts Guide and see where that takes you. Tom Kyte's books are worth reading. For PL/SQL programming, Stephen Feuerstein's book is a good introduction, and Connor McDonald's "Mastering Oracle PL/SQL" is pretty good as well. (Oracle Database 10g PL/SQL Programming (Oracle Press) sucked IMHO.)
    would definitely suggest tom kyte's books

    set up a linux box in your house and install it...best way to learn about a db is to use it. also helps when reading a book to have a live instance available for you to destroy

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    42
    thanks for your replies.
    i wanna know in the long run which of these has the potential to pay me more
    a DBA job or a job as a Database Designer?
    afterall we all work to earn more
    of course i know performance at any level is the key.
    @aglio412 : what is linux box

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    565
    My experience is that design jobs tend to expect a fair amount of development experience. Also based on recent jobserve search results, these days they also expect some experience of designing multi-tier applications, UML, Java and so on, rather than pure database schema design (possibly a worrying trend but that's the market for you).

    Personally I see myself as a database developer, though again according to our overlords in the Agile/Java/VB world we don't seem to exist.

    A Linux box is a box that runs Linux.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    796
    Provided Answers: 1
    I worked as a designer (albeit 'only' a software designer, as opposed to a database designer) but only got the job after MANY years of development. I enjoyed the work immensely (more so than the DBA job I have now) but I've found it's not so much how much you can potentially earn but what jobs are available.
    90% of users' problems can be resolved by punching them - the other 10% by switching off their PCs.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    42
    big thanks to everyone for the insight

    @WilliamR: i wonder why u need to have development knowlodge. why is the trend changing?
    i have learnt Java n .net development but i m not a master at it

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    565
    It helps to have built a few systems yourself before you start telling others how to build them as a technical designer. This is in contrast to a business analyst who would approach things from a business requirements perspective.

    First business requirements are gathered by an analyst, then architectural decisions are made about the technology to be used and how it should hang together at a high level (a technical architect might come in here), then a detailed specification is worked out telling developers exactly what to build (though various Rapid Application Development approaches such as Agile/Extreme programming say you should keep this to a minimum as it will inevitably change, and instead focus on flexibility and constant quality control). This will involve more than just the database schema design (for example it may include design of user interface components) and experience of all the technologies involved is useful.

    I suppose what has changed is that more technology layers are typically involved than used to be the case. What worries me as a database specialist is that schema design is often not well understood by developers from a GUI programming background.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    42

    Question

    u say that "schema design is often not well understood by developers from a GUI programming background"
    how different is it?
    and is 10g the latest version of the oracle db. if so is 9i still popular. i find that wherever i go i get to see 9i being used
    Last edited by iinfi; 05-05-06 at 08:26.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    492
    I think what he's saying (without putting words in his mouth) that a lot of developers who are strong in java or other languages don't understand anything about a database. They view it as sort of a black box, and just dump their data in, and let java do all the work. A lot of the time they do not understand or utilize normalization and let the other language deal with all the data, instead of the database. Thats my opinion from meeting a couple of them - they are masters of java, but have little to no understanding of how a database should work properly.

    9i is still around in a lot of companies and will be until Oracle moves to desupport it. Its like any other software application - there will always be a new version, but wherever you go you will find users still on an earlier version until it won't serve their needs any more.
    Oracle OCPI (Certified Practicing Idiot)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    42
    i enquired for a Oracle University (Oracle training center) at my place here and they told me to do a certification in 10g and not 9i as soon companies will move over to 10g.
    they say 10g is more easier to learn and since 10g is complete GUI u will not be able to manage 10g if u learn 9i and the converse is also true.

    needless to say i m totally confused.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    565
    You might as well train on the latest version. There are improvements and new features in 10g, but most of what you learn will still be good for 9i.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Liverpool, NY USA
    Posts
    2,509
    Quote Originally Posted by iinfi
    i enquired for a Oracle University (Oracle training center) at my place here and they told me to do a certification in 10g and not 9i as soon companies will move over to 10g.
    they say 10g is more easier to learn and since 10g is complete GUI u will not be able to manage 10g if u learn 9i and the converse is also true.

    needless to say i m totally confused.
    Of course Oracle is going to push training on their latest and greatest product and while 10Gr2 is gui, I still feel that any developer or dba worth their salt needs to learn the actual commands that the Gui is actually issuing. I guarentee that there will be a time that the gui is not available and the only way to recover your database is to know the actual commands. As for what you want to train in, learn 10G. If you get hired at a place that uses 9,8,7, or 6 then you will be able to do the work because you know the actual commands and done the research to know what commands are available for each database level.
    Bill
    You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    42
    sud i learn oracle DBA in Linux platform or in windows platform
    will it be easy to administer in windows platform if i learn in linux platform?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •