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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    which database to choose

    Hi,

    I am looking for a database which can handle table with large number of rows (around 3 million), do efficient sort, is reliable, and preferably fast. I will be using java for queries (if it makes a difference). I am thinking of going with Postgresql rite now. Any suggestions.

    regards,
    nitin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    362

    Database

    You have to thing about oracle or db2 or something like them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Is there a free version of these databases. I cant afford to buy one. Which is the best one among those which are free.

    nitin

  4. #4
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    Jan 2005
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    Derby

    Look at Derby even I did not test that database with so many records (see the site), there is an "oracle lite" database,you can see the permisions at oracle's site.
    Dimis

  5. #5
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    Jan 2005
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    Oracle express


  6. #6
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    Rather than Oracle Express, I really would use PostgreSQL.

    Ref post #5 in the PostgreSQL FAQ
    Last edited by loquin; 05-17-06 at 13:38.
    Lou
    使大吃一惊
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  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Agree with Loquin's comments regarding suitablilty and features, in the end your choice of db often comes down to other reqasons

    there seems to be little between MySQL & POSTGRES, espceially as MySQL now supports triggers.

    too much of the comment on the web and elsehwere comes down to personal experience and in some cases prejudice - because soemone has used db x then they reccommend it, becasue person Y had a bad experience, or doesnt like company Z they hate product W from company Z.

    part of the final choice comes down to various non technical criteria
    - access to the application (less of an issue these days)
    - access to documentation (not just the suppliers docs but boos and other references)
    - access to support (eg friends or colleagues (and more recently forums such as this site and others)
    - is there a need for soemthing to look good on the cv (some employers are very sniffy about people with POSTGRES or MySQL experience)

    sometimes technical requirements are important
    - ease of installation (MySQL, MSDE SQL Server 2000 have all been straightforward in my view)
    - support tools (software to create, maintain and manipulate (mysql has administrator & query browser that do most of whta you want)
    - corporate policy, ie we only use xxxxxx.

    without knowing in detail what your application is I suspect that any "serious" server product will meet your requirements. I'm guessing that each servers idiosyncracies will not be a major stumbling block. Ie you are not doing anything particularly exotic. So it could come down to ease of intergation of the db driver within JAVA, so possibly the quality of the JAVA driver may be the more significant element.

    HTH
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    This is an easy question!

    Your choice will be between Oracle Express or SQL Server 2005 Express.

    Does "mySql" or whatever it is, let you create a unique constraint yet?

    Does it support transactions?

    The TCO of using "mySql" would be so high, that you would go bankrupt anyway.

    On a more serious note, Oracle Express and SQL Server 2005 Express do have some limitations. However should you need to exceed these, the cost of the upgraded product would not be, in anyway, an issue.
    Last edited by r123456; 05-22-06 at 10:05.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by r123456
    This is an easy question!

    Your choice will be between Oracle Express or SQL Server 2005 Express.

    Does "mySql" or whatever it is, let you create a unique constraint yet?

    Does it support transactions?

    The TCO of using "mySql" would be so high, that you would go bankrupt anyway.

    On a more serious note, Oracle Express and SQL Server 2005 Express do have some limitations. However should you need to exceed these, the cost of the upgraded product would not be, in anyway, an issue.
    some answers to r123456 statements/questions and others, YES, YES, NO. I have heard lots of people experiencing problems setting up and maintaining an Oracle platform.

    there is no such thing as a free lunch, there are always going to be some problems with any proposal.
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by r123456
    Does "mySql" or whatever it is, let you create a unique constraint yet?
    yes, for many years now


    Quote Originally Posted by r123456
    Does it support transactions?
    yes, since last year


    Quote Originally Posted by r123456
    The TCO of using "mySql" would be so high, that you would go bankrupt anyway.
    that's ridiculous

    please stop trolling
    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
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  11. #11
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    Feb 2004
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    MySQL makes it hard to compute the true TCO, which makes many people consider that cost to be MUCH lower than what it really is to the owner... For a large company that has DBAs on staff for 24 by 7 coverage anyway and already have access to programmer's that can modify and support the database engine, the hidden costs are insignificant. For the average company, the costs can remain hidden for a long time, but those costs are still there.

    MySQL is definitely NOT a bad product. Given the right fit, I recommend it. Be carefull about using MySQL for "mission critical" applications if you or your ISP do not have the resources to support MySQL. The hidden costs of using MySQL have killed many small to mid-sized companies when a database that they needed for day-to-day business breaks down and there isn't either a support system or fallback plan.

    DBForums runs on MySQL. Every few months when the engine breaks down, the entire site goes offline for hours or days while people scramble furioiusly to get things back in shape. Not everyone has the kind of folks that even can do that, much less on a moment's notice. Consider the cost of an outage every few months, and factor the cost of that outage plus any additional service cost needed to bring things back online into your business plan.

    -PatP

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by nitinjindal83
    Is there a free version of these databases. I cant afford to buy one. Which is the best one among those which are free.

    nitin
    This statement to me means:
    - not mission critical
    - not a priority product
    - not going to be supported by the company

    I think you should probably be looking first at what you can get installed without many problems. Any of the major distributions should be able to handle the number of rows you're talking about.

    Are you thinking it will be a priority product in the future with a budget?

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