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  1. #1
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    Dec 2005
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    Unanswered: What r the possible methods?

    Hi,

    I need to design and implement an inventory database for a medium size compnay.
    1) What are the possible ways for doing this?

    2) After finishing the implemenatation, what do i need to deliver to the company?? because nobody gives the source of his code.

    3) How to deploy/install the database to about 10 computers???


    Thanks a lot for helping me

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    1) How many stars are there in the sky? That is your answer ...

    2) You need to deliver whatever is agreed to ... Possibly even the source code.

    3) By whatever method you choose to ... See answer #1 for more details.


    Do you get the sense that a general non-specific question will yield you a general non-specific answer?
    Back to Access ... ADO is not the way to go for speed ...

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    It sounds to me like you are a consultant for this company. If so, then the answer to number one is determined primarily by your client. You will want to have several conversations with people who will be using the database, people that will be managing the database, etc. An inventory database can track vary widely on what kind of inventory you are tracking.

    For number two, the consensus in previous threads is that, you would deliver the source code with the project if the project is purely custom. Meaning, if you coded the entire project for the client and didn't used code from previous projects then you should provide the client with the source.

    If you don't feel like you need to provide the source then convert your database to an MDE and it will protect your code. You probably want to do this anyway, as it will run a little faster.

    If the database is purely Access then you will definitely want to create a frontend database and a backend database. THe backend stores all the data and the frontend all of the forms, reports, queries, etc. Usually updates, will be in the front end. So with this configuration you can switch out frontends quickly, change how the program works, without changing any of their existing data.

    As far as supporting the database, you would probably want each user to have a compy of the frontend on his/her computer. And have it connect to the backend (stored on a server). As far as updating the frontend goes, you can create an autoupdate routine to check a version number or modification date for the latest frontend and copy it to the user's desktop auotomatically. Or just do it manually yourself. There are a number of options with distribution of the frontend.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    7
    Quote Originally Posted by M Owen
    1) How many stars are there in the sky? That is your answer ...

    2) You need to deliver whatever is agreed to ... Possibly even the source code.

    3) By whatever method you choose to ... See answer #1 for more details.


    Do you get the sense that a general non-specific question will yield you a general non-specific answer?
    You could have saved yourself the effort to write this post.......

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by DCKunkle
    It sounds to me like you are a consultant for this company. If so, then the answer to number one is determined primarily by your client. You will want to have several conversations with people who will be using the database, people that will be managing the database, etc. An inventory database can track vary widely on what kind of inventory you are tracking.

    For number two, the consensus in previous threads is that, you would deliver the source code with the project if the project is purely custom. Meaning, if you coded the entire project for the client and didn't used code from previous projects then you should provide the client with the source.

    If you don't feel like you need to provide the source then convert your database to an MDE and it will protect your code. You probably want to do this anyway, as it will run a little faster.

    If the database is purely Access then you will definitely want to create a frontend database and a backend database. THe backend stores all the data and the frontend all of the forms, reports, queries, etc. Usually updates, will be in the front end. So with this configuration you can switch out frontends quickly, change how the program works, without changing any of their existing data.

    As far as supporting the database, you would probably want each user to have a compy of the frontend on his/her computer. And have it connect to the backend (stored on a server). As far as updating the frontend goes, you can create an autoupdate routine to check a version number or modification date for the latest frontend and copy it to the user's desktop auotomatically. Or just do it manually yourself. There are a number of options with distribution of the frontend.
    Hi,

    Thanks a lot for the nice post.

    1) I can program in java, jsp, and c#, develop using access, and sql server 2000, but i have never implemented such a big project. This is why I am asking about the possible ways to create the project. Which combination is the best?? (PS: company has about 3000 line items, 10 employee computers)

    2+3) I find the method you have described a good one. But I have 2 questions:
    a. Won't it be slow this way?
    b. What if 2 employees are accessing/altering the same record simultaneously?


    Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesand4
    You could have saved yourself the effort to write this post.......
    True ... But think of this as the statutory lesson for other posters who ask the same kind of useless questions in the future ...

    In the future, perhaps it might be better to say that you don't know what question(s) to ask, but here is my scenario ... Can someone help me define what I need to ask ...
    Back to Access ... ADO is not the way to go for speed ...

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Location
    Chicago, IL
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    To be able to develop efficient 100% Access database that many people will be using can be challenging. There are several people that can help with ways to optimize a database. But if you have access to a SQL Server database I would suggest SQL Server backend and an Access Data Project frontend (ADP).

    Access will give you the ability to create forms, reports, etc. very quickly. While using SQL Server will give you better performance (in general). With a conventional Access database, all of the sorting, calculations, etc. are done on the users workstation. Using SQL Server as the backend takes advantage of the server to do the filtering, sorting, etc.

    As far as two users trying to modify the same record, that is a universal problem. All databases will be subject to that problem.

    Performance depends on expectations. I have tables with several million records in a 100% Access database. Queries can take several seconds to several minutes, but my 1 or 2 users expect that. From the threads I have read on this forum, about 10 users and several thousand records is doable in Access, but again if you have the choice use a more robust database for the backend.

    I myself am converting my databases to use a SQL Server 2005 database. Primarily for security issues more than performance.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by DCKunkle
    But if you have access to a SQL Server database I would suggest SQL Server backend and an Access Data Project frontend (ADP).

    Access will give you the ability to create forms, reports, etc. very quickly. While using SQL Server will give you better performance (in general).
    Hi,

    how can this be done?? (ADP)

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