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  1. #1
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    Unanswered: SQL Learning Material

    Good day all.....

    I suspect this is more of an advisory question.

    My SQL is, at its best terrrible. So Im going to purchase a book that will, I hope take me from from very low capability to at least functional at a reasonable level

    Anyone out there know of something in this range that I can order via the average bookshop?
    Many thanks guys

    Gareth

  2. #2
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    Personally I wouldn't bother buying a SQL book simply because SQL is a very simple language to learn - it is the application to difficult problems that can be tricky and that really comes with experience.

    This link (and the other two in the series) will get you a long way in Access SQL:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...l/acintsql.asp

    If you want to learn more ANSI compliant SQL try getting a hold of SQL Server express and work your way through some T-SQL tutorials.

    The only academic reading I have done re SQL was part of this course:
    http://www3.open.ac.uk/courses/bin/p12.dll?C01M876

    If you get hold of the materials (including the software) then you can learn general relational principles (including relational calculus and algebra - the underpinnings of SQL) as well as SQL.

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  3. #3
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    what I do is is Use the Query build in msaccess and always have a look @ the SQL Statement. You Will pick up very quickly

    The Last company I work for use a AS400 and a Database on that so What i created the table the same in msaccess as what was on the AS400 then I made the querys copy pasted the SQL into AS400 and guest what they work
    hope this help

    See clear as mud


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  4. #4
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    I do agree with Poots that it's the application (or generation if you will) of the SQL statement that is the trickiest (that's why we get paid the big bucks as we do ...) although SQL is not easy to learn - well kinda - the simple stuff yes. As for reference material, I do have 1 book: The Complete Reference SQL by Groff & Weinberg from Osborne Press. It's generic in that it covers ANSI SQL and various flavors/extensions to it by the various database vendors ...
    Back to Access ... ADO is not the way to go for speed ...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by M Owen
    ...that's why we get paid the big bucks as we do ...
    ROFL

    Mike - is that reference good for sort of "this is a typical business requirement and here are some SQL approaches to solving it" question or is it a straight language type book? Reason I ask is that I would be interested in the former. I have also never had need to use recursive or tree structure SQL so I am a bit lost with anything to do with that.

    Another thing I thought of - some mnemonic is really handy when you are first learning SQL so you can recall your clauses (unless you can easily remember SELECT FROM WHERE GROUP BY HAVING ORDER BY).
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by pootle flump
    ROFL

    Mike - is that reference good for sort of "this is a typical business requirement and here are some SQL approaches to solving it" question or is it a straight language type book? Reason I ask is that I would be interested in the former. I have also never had need to use recursive or tree structure SQL so I am a bit lost with anything to do with that.

    Another thing I thought of - some mnemonic is really handy when you are first learning SQL so you can recall your clauses (unless you can easily remember SELECT FROM WHERE GROUP BY HAVING ORDER BY).

    It's a bit of both ... As even most of the CRAP books have examples (and the reason they're crap? examples are completely useless), I actually prefer the latter. I want to see the structure and then I can figure out how to write the query ...

    This book specifically gives you the underpinings of SQL and a comparison of the majors against each other (blurb on the jacket).

    Now, I have another book: THe programmer's Guide to SQL by Darie & Watson, et al. by A! Press.

    This I think is what you're talking about. It has examples and solutions ... To me, it is/was a complete waste of money ... They have solutions. BUT NOT THE ONE I'M LOOKING FOR ...

    I think you just invented the SFWGBHOB ... Your moniker will go down in infamy ...
    Back to Access ... ADO is not the way to go for speed ...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by M Owen
    The Complete Reference SQL by Groff & Weinberg from Osborne Press. It's generic in that it covers ANSI SQL and various flavors/extensions to it by the various database vendors ...
    it's a good attempt but that book is pants

    i cannot now recall all the various areas i thought it was deficient, but one was the lousy index -- for example, try looking up "date functions"
    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by M Owen
    Now, I have another book: THe programmer's Guide to SQL by Darie & Watson, et al. by A! Press.

    This I think is what you're talking about. It has examples and solutions ... To me, it is/was a complete waste of money ... They have solutions. BUT NOT THE ONE I'M LOOKING FOR ...

    I think you just invented the SFWGBHOB ... Your moniker will go down in infamy ...
    Hmm - yes - actually I imagine you are right. I think it is simply because you sometimes see on these forums a solution to a problem that makes you smack your forehead because you never thought of it. But digging these things out from a book when you have a specific problem in mind....different story. Good point.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by r937
    it's a good attempt but that book is pants

    i cannot now recall all the various areas i thought it was deficient, but one was the lousy index -- for example, try looking up "date functions"

    Rudy,

    What is "pants"???? As for the book: It has been of VERY limited use for me over the years but for some syntax things that it does cover it was helpful. I mean hell, this copy I have is from '98 ... Not exactly the most up to date ...

    For the most part, almost any book you get on any topic is not gonna have everything you need to get the job done ... And I know cause I've bought the damn things over the years just as you have most likely ...
    Back to Access ... ADO is not the way to go for speed ...

  10. #10
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    pants is defined on this page -- http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/p.htm

    i actually don't buy a lot of books, never did

    but i do have all of joe celko's

    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by r937
    but i do have all of joe celko's
    That was one I had in mind. I know of a couple of "SQL for smarties" books. Are they any good? Are they just an exercise in "pimp up my SQL" or do they address real world problems & solutions?
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  12. #12
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    there is only one SQL for Smarties, but it was completely revised last year and is a lot bigger now (which only makes sense, as there is now way more to know)

    i'm not sure what "pimp up" means but the one that comes closest would be his SQL Programming Style
    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
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