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  1. #1
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    Nov 2004
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    Unanswered: Big jump from SQL Server?

    Howdy Oracle guys! Ive been a SQL Server DBA for some time now, and am giving some thought to making the switch. We don't use Oracle at my work so the only option I have is to go for the entry level Oracle DBA cert. I have every intention of actually learning the material, not just memorizing answers.

    Can anyone give me any pointers/ time savers?

    Is this a rough transition?

    Is it absolutely essential to learn Oracle on Unix, or would I still gain value from learning it on Windows?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Where the Surf Meets the Turf @Del Mar, CA
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    IMO, I suggest you pick a different path.
    I seriously doubt you could get hired as an Oracle DBA without any real world experience.

    HTH & YMMV!
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  3. #3
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    Nov 2004
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    I appreciate your honesty and I agree, absolutely nobody would hire me as an Oracle DBA.

    My hope though is to wind up somewhere that uses both SQL and Oracle(there are a few near me), and slowly work my way in.

  4. #4
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    >and slowly work my way in.
    This is the most likely scenario.
    Many employers will reimburse for technical training that enhances jobs skills.
    Do it in their dime & not your own.
    Start of by really reading the Concepts Manual found at
    http://tahiti.oracle.com
    http://asktom.oracle.com has many fine coding examples & any book by Tom Kyte (his asktom site) is an EXCELLENT resource
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,245
    I would not go so far as to call myself an experienced Oracle DBA...I have completed the OCA requirements and am about halfway through OCP (on 9i).

    I took a position with an organization running both SQL and Oracle. I was supposed to work with another DBA who was supposedly better versed in Oracle. He walked out two months after I joined up and I came to find out how little he really knew/did as an Oracle DBA.

    It was -- and remains -- an ideal situation in many respects. I have learned Oracle 8i, 9i and 10g. I have learned user-managed backups, RMAN backups, export/import and a ton of other stuff (though I realize that in many respects I have barely scratched the surface). The 9i Fundamentals II course was a real eye-opener for me and gave me a far greater understanding of how to manage backups and recovery. It was worth every penny (that my company reimbursed me for!).

    We only run Oracle on Windows (for now, anyway). There are definitely some quirks that exist in the Windows world that don't seem to be as big an issue in *nix. That said, most of the database concepts are transferable; the operating system stuff is another matter altogether.

    Set up an instance on a computer at your home and work through some of the material from a study guide. You'll have to dedicate some time to it, but it could be well worth the effort.

    Remember that the certifications are ultimately only worth what you put into them...

    Regards,

    hmscott
    Have you hugged your backup today?

  6. #6
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    I took a position with an organization running both SQL and Oracle
    Both SQL Server and Oracle, you mean?

  7. #7
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    Dec 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamR
    Both SQL Server and Oracle, you mean?
    Touche.

    Yes, I meant SQL Server...

    Regards,

    hmscott
    Have you hugged your backup today?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    128
    I'm starting to really entertain this idea. Can someone enlighten me though on what to do about the OS? I obviously want to be the most marketable for what Im attempting to do, but I have no intention of also trying to teach myself a non GUI version of *nix. That being said, I can:

    1; Install on Windows.
    2; Install on a GUI version of *nix.

    Does number 2 hold any value in the real world, or is it looked at the same as number 1?

  9. #9
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    This is my opinion: With today's technology (oracle 10gR2 and so on), on what a DBA respect to the difference of both operating system is only tough at install time, that is, if you are setting up everything from scratch. Windows would be _easier_ while the many *nix version Oracle runs on require you _set up_ some things before you begin. Now, that being said, once the database is up and running, I don't think you, as a DBA, must be worry about what OS your database is running on. Don't get me wrong, if you have some deep experience in *nix you would be getting the most out of the OS, but that's what SA are for, to help you setting up things, you tell them "is there anyway I can increase the OS buffer cache?" they should do it for you, you tell them "I need four different slices on different disks to put my datafiles so I can achieve even I/O", they give you that, you tell them "I need to create a shell script to run a background job at midnight", they should give you that, and so on. Organization _usually_ have a/many SAs and a/many DBAs, and they usually work together.

    And besides, Oracle is rather BIG for you already. Don't worry too much about the OS itself if you're just starting. Try to grab as much as you can from Oracle.

  10. #10
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    Nov 2004
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    Im actually shocked to hear that. I thought the reaction would be just the opposite, and that I would be told "dont bother with Oracle if you don't do it on *nix". Thanks.

    This being said, is there any benefit to learning it on a GUI version of *nix, or would that be no more valuable than learning it on Windows?

  11. #11
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    I'm not a DBA at all, but what I understand from our DBAs the real DBA's work is mostly done using command line commands for Oracle. Not through the GUI (but then all our Oracle servers are running Linux)

    I was to be a DBA I think I'd feel much more comfortable if I could manage Oracle without a GUI.

  12. #12
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    If you mean GUI as using Oracle with a Desktop manager (like KDE, CDE, GNOME, etc.) and you're just doing this to catch up things up, I would suggest you to install Oracle in non-gui mode and pick up whatever unix flavor you want (Solaris would be my preffered). That way you will learn how to install Oracle from scratch and what needs to be set on the operating system side to get things running.

    I like GUIs, I try to use them as much as I can. Only when I am forced (for example, I had to set up one of our DW ETL process by _hand_ because they wont invest on a GUI solution -like OWB-) I dont use them.

  13. #13
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    Thumbs up


    Good luck!

    Get as far away from WinDoze as you can.

    PS: Learn Unix also.
    The person who says it can't be done should not interrupt the person doing it. -- Chinese proverb

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