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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    196

    Unanswered: Interaction with VB/VBA

    Hi there,

    I've just started learning SQL - I already know a bit of VB/VBA and my aim is to become a software developer using both SQL and VB.

    One question I have is how would the average programmer go about managing the database? Are SQL commands (queries/add record/make table etc) normally programmed and controlled in VB itself via the docommand.runSQL on the event triggers or are they managed from the SQL Server application themselves? Also, if there are any other comments on how VB works with SQL I'd be very interested to hear them.

    My assumption is that the database commands are managed from VB and any automated download/import or export of data into or from the SQL database is scheduled from SQL server itself.

    Many thanks for your time in reading.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    50
    If you use MS SQL Server 7 or 2000 you can use Enterprise Manager to manage your databases. If you use SQL Server 2005 then you can use SQL Server Management Studio to do the same.

    You can connect to your SQL Server db from VB6 with ADO and with ADO.NET from VB.NET.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    196
    Many thanks for your reply - how about if you're using MS Access for the front end?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    The Bottom of The Barrel
    Posts
    6,102
    Provided Answers: 1
    ADO works fine when using Access as a front end. Even better if you use an adp. You can use the majority of your VBA functions from access if you like. However, a wise developer ports the lionshare of their data-centric business logic to the database itself.
    oh yeah... documentation... I have heard of that.

    *** What Do You Want In The MS Access Forum? ***

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuerteventura
    Many thanks for your reply - how about if you're using MS Access for the front end?
    If you use MS Access the only difference will be that you'll manage your data from the MS Access environment, but you will still use ADO and ADO.NET from your VB applications.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    One Flump in One Place
    Posts
    14,912
    If you are using SQL 2K and you are wise you will avoid Enterprise Manager and use Query Analyser. EM is a GUI, QA allows programmatic access to the database - much more powerful and much more flexible.

    DBAs don't typically use Access or EM to manage a SQL Server db but YMMV depending on how much control you are looking for.

    HTH
    Testimonial:
    pootle flump
    ur codings are working excelent.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by pootle flump
    If you are using SQL 2K and you are wise you will avoid Enterprise Manager and use Query Analyser. EM is a GUI, QA allows programmatic access to the database - much more powerful and much more flexible.

    DBAs don't typically use Access or EM to manage a SQL Server db but YMMV depending on how much control you are looking for.

    HTH
    I use EM daily to run hand-built queries and I do have programmatic access to my databases. I use QA too, but for the most things EM is just fine.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    on the wrong server
    Posts
    8,835
    Provided Answers: 6
    yeah but if you script everything, you are more efficient because all you have to do is it hit f5 and you have less hassles when sql goes to a new version and your ui changes.
    “If one brings so much courage to this world the world has to kill them or break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” Earnest Hemingway, A Farewell To Arms.

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