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  1. #1
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    Mar 2007
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    Unanswered: Is MS SQL Server Right for Us?

    We are currently using Centura Sqlbase as our ERP database server. Our server is serving 3 same structure databases for 3 separate companies with 3 completely separate accounting, financing, receiving etc. There are a total of 40 concurrent users between the 3 databases. One of the databases is around 4 gig and the other 2 about 2 gig.

    Over the past 10 years maintaining Centura Sqlbase has been a no brainer with the exception of having to do an occasional unload/load (reorg) of the database, it required very little maintenance.

    95% of our reports are generated from within our ERP software and the 5% are done through Crystal reports.

    There are 2 primary reasons for us to move on to a more robust database server:

    1) Recently we have been having random record locking issues where there would be delays in completing labor and inventory transactions. It suspected cause from our ERP support has pointed to Sqlbase not keeping up to the tasks.

    2) We are investigating a 3rd party applications for electronic data collection, labor collecting as well as labor scheduling. These 3rd party applications only support either MS Sqlserver or Oracle.

    After researching both MS Sqlserver and Oracle SE One both seem to be viable and would perform well for my needs and are comparable in price.

    So my questions to the MS SQL Server forum are:

    1) How does it handle record locking?

    2) What kinds of regular maintenance is required?

    3) Are there any issues with it and Crystal reports?

    Any input or suggestions are welcome.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I notice you cross-posted this on the Oracle forum....

    Unless you want to be a full-blown Oracle dba, do not use Oracle. Oracle administration is a nightmare, and even the new tools do not smooth it out much. Just getting Oracle installed is a headache. SQL Server admin is much easier by orders of magnitude.

    SQL Server does a great job at handling record locking. I used to get locking and blocking issues frequently back on 6.5, but I have not personally experience a locking issue on SQL Server in years.

    SQL Server can handle a database application of the size you describe with ease.

    SQL Server's Transact SQL language is much more sensible and easier to code in than Oracle's PL/SQL implementation.

    If you choose Oracle, then to answer you question on the other forum "Yes. You will end up working for Oracle."
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Quote was edited and comments were removed that did not contribute to whether or not MS SQL Server would work for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by blindman
    SQL Server does a great job at handling record locking. I used to get locking and blocking issues frequently back on 6.5, but I have not personally experience a locking issue on SQL Server in years.

    SQL Server can handle a database application of the size you describe with ease.
    Thanks for the info.

    Over the past few days I have really concentrated my efforts on determining my be avenue. Talking with the maker of our ERP software to various support associates.

    Is there a reference or some readings that can be recommended on what the current maintenance schedule requirements are; daily, weekly, monthly, or annually?

    Recommended unload/load schedule? Under Sqlbase it was recommended once a month, but I have left it go as long as a year or longer.

    I would imagine there are scripts that can be scheduled for nightly backups. Is restoring a backup straight forward?

    Sorry for the newbie kind of questions, but the more that I can get now the more that I know that I need to study later
    Last edited by B18; 03-08-07 at 20:49.

  4. #4
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    We use SQL Server to support the daily and historical financial data for stock markets in several countries, which is then used for both research and reporting. That background is just to support the size and transactional nature of our database. Without knowing your system at all, I betcha we beat the crap out of our data at a higher rate than you guys do

    You do not have to do any "load/unloading". If I understand it, that stuff is what reorganizes/reindexes/etc. your database?

    I have indexing jobs that run on a nightly basis, that is if the index has become muddled enough to warrant the reindex. I also have full nightly backups for each of our databases (we have around 21 - give or take - on each of 8 production and 3 development servers). We also backup the heavy-hitters on a half-hour basis during the day as well (log backups).

    Part of the nightly backup job/script is also a shrink operation to keep each database lean and mean.

    We are using SQL Server 2K, and are immensely happy with it. Having come from a background using Sybase, Tandem SQL, Oracle, and some gawdawful other SQL service that everyone would remember if I said it, but I have thankfully blacked out that part of my memory, The tools and support needs of SQL Server are miles ahead, and miles away from any of these other DBMS I have had experience with.

    ...and, as you have discovered, there are myriad other third-party software providers out there that can help you with reporting, maintenance, and just about any other need you can imagine - - just in case you should feel the need to pay someone else for a pretty UI on top of the tools already available from MS SQL Server.

    Backup and restore are simple and speedy. Either through scripts (which I like to use in our scheduled jobs) or through the UI's provided.

    Glad to see you doing your up-front homework, and good luck!

    Lemme tell ya...Since I Moved into the SQL Server world, I get to be a "DBA" AND a software developer (though my old DBA friends would argue about me being the former - - Hmmmm...and some even the latter for that matter). I get to go home and night at 6PM and not have to worry about my databases until the developers get in the following morning *cringe*

    *edit*
    Oh yeah, we have databases that range in size from 1 to 25 Gb in size.
    Last edited by TallCowboy0614; 03-08-07 at 20:48.
    aka "Paul"
    Non est ei similis.

    I just read "100 Things To Do Before You Die". I was surprised that "Yell for help!!" wasn't one of them

  5. #5
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    A standard backup is schedule would be full backups every night and hourly transaction log dumps. These are typically set up as automated jobs through SQL Server's Job Scheduler utility. You can create your own backup jobs (easy enough to do) or use the Maintenance Plan Wizard to create them.

    I have to second TallCowboy's comment about reliability and ease of maintenance. I literally cannot remember the last time I got a call to fix a sql server problem at 1am. It has to have been five or six years ago back with SQL Server version 6.5.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    >>Unless you want to be a full-blown Oracle dba, do not use Oracle. Oracle administration is a nightmare, and even the new tools do not smooth it out much. Just getting Oracle installed is a headache. SQL Server admin is much easier by orders of magnitude.

    But Oracle DBA's get paid more.

    ddave

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dolfandave
    >>Unless you want to be a full-blown Oracle dba, do not use Oracle. Oracle administration is a nightmare, and even the new tools do not smooth it out much. Just getting Oracle installed is a headache. SQL Server admin is much easier by orders of magnitude.

    But Oracle DBA's get paid more.

    ddave
    yeah, but so do COBOL programmers
    aka "Paul"
    Non est ei similis.

    I just read "100 Things To Do Before You Die". I was surprised that "Yell for help!!" wasn't one of them

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dolfandave
    But Oracle DBA's get paid more.
    ...and that should be a big clue as to which system is easier to administer...
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    22
    So which one did you guys prefer finally - MS SQL or Oracle ?

    Thanks

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