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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3

    Unanswered: Undoing the restore database?? URGENT!!

    Hi there...

    Is it possible to undoing the restore database??

    I accidentally restore an old database backup to my current database!!
    The worst is I don't have any new backup for my current database....

    So ... does anybody here know how to solve this problem??
    Can I undo the transaction log?? if it is possible.. could you please teach me the way to undo it?? I'm desperate.....

    I'd greatly appreciate if you can answer me....

    Thanks in advance...
    __________________
    Best Regards,
    Debbie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,245
    Ctrl-Z?

    Sorry, I know that wasn't the answer you were looking for.

    There is no undo that I am aware of. You might consider the folowing (possible) sources:

    1. Was there a near-recent (last 30 days) backup that you can use?
    2. Is Volume shadow copy enabled? Can you recover anything from it?
    3. Are there NT backups in force on the server? Can you recover anything from those?

    In general, I would have to say that you are out of luck. Hopefully its not business critical and its a lesson you can carry with you from now on.

    Regards,

    hmscott
    Have you hugged your backup today?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3


    I'm really out of luck then...

    Thanks for your 3 possible sources, but I don't have any one of them...
    Yeah, this is not a business critical.. but that is all my hardwork inside the database... all my database structure had gone because of the stupidity from myself.... *sigh*

    Nothing I can do now.... I'll never forget this lessons for the whole of my life...

    Anyway, thanks for your reply... Thank you very much...

    Regards
    Debbie

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,313

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,245
    I hope this doesn't come across the wrong way, but...

    1. Chalk it up as a lesson learned. Don't be afraid of failure. If it only impacts you, then chin up, move out and draw fire.

    2. If this is something that affects the business, don't hide. Tell your boss or whoever's in charge. Tell them before they ask. Tell them exactly what you did and what you're going to do to make sure it doesn't happen again.

    3. Nothing will lose you credibility faster than to try to hide the situation and have someone discover it later on. Nothing will gain you more respect than to openly admit the error, fix it and then take measures to ensure it doesn't happen again.

    4. Someone once said that there are two kinds of DBA: those who have lost a database and those who will. Edit: the trick is to not be the third kind of DBA -- one that loses databases repeatedly.

    This may be gratuitous advice -- if so, please ignore. Just kick back, have a beer (or beverage of your choice) and drive on.

    Regards,

    hmscott
    Last edited by hmscott; 05-03-07 at 13:04.
    Have you hugged your backup today?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by hmscott
    Just kick back, have a beer (or beverage of your choice) and drive on.
    I don't think you should be condoning drink-driving!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    The Bottom of The Barrel
    Posts
    6,102
    Provided Answers: 1
    Quote Originally Posted by jezemine
    Ouch... that's one gig that doesn't go on the resume...
    oh yeah... documentation... I have heard of that.

    *** What Do You Want In The MS Access Forum? ***

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    One Flump in One Place
    Posts
    14,912
    Quote Originally Posted by declovey
    all my database structure had gone because of the stupidity from myself.... *sigh*

    Nothing I can do now.... I'll never forget this lessons for the whole of my life...
    Hi Debbie

    Apart from obviously scheduling a regular backup (and doing test restores) you would also be well advised to script your changes in source control ideally, on the file system at worst, and execute these on your database. That way you can at minimum get your schema back if things start hitting the fan and you have no recent backup.

    HTH
    Testimonial:
    pootle flump
    ur codings are working excelent.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,313
    If you follow pootle's advice here (and you should!) I have a little app that will help you get all your objects in source control if they are not already. works against 2000 and 2005. it generates scripts for every object, separate file for each, in a tree similar to that in Object Explorer. It's open source so you can tweak it if you need to:

    http://www.elsasoft.org/tools.htm

    HTH

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