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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    348

    Unanswered: Adding new reports to a DB you don't have access to

    I have an Access file I created that is being used by someone offsite. I don't have access to it. A report was requested so I built the queries and reports necessary to make it happen in my original copy. Then came the issue of how to get it to them. I came up with two options:
    1. Send them my File and tell them to export the Queries and Reports to their file
    2. Send them my File and tell them to import their data


    I opted for the first. It seems like their might be a better way, any suggestions?

    As an aside question, when you have a subform and want to color the background AND allow for a scroll bar, how do you color the space where the scroll bar would appear, until I have enough data to cause the scroll bar to come in I get an ugly beige rectangle. Thanks very much.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    UK
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    Provided Answers: 10
    right click the form and go to "Send to..."
    I think you can simply e-mail the components, but having never used that function I'm not entirely sure.


    EDIT: Finally tried that, doesn't appear to work as you'd expect with forms
    Last edited by gvee; 05-04-07 at 07:49.
    George
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    California, USA
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    The best thing with any Access database, and for sure when it will be deployed off-site, is to make it two databases. One with all the data (tables) and one with everything else. That way, when you create a new report and queries (or forms too), you just send them a new copy. They install it and it is already linked to the data in the data database. The only drawback, which I have not found to be a drawback, is you need to have the exact same drive and folder structure as the remote site. I have had over twenty customers in the last 5 or 6 years and have had no problem matching all of their drive and folder structure.
    HTH,

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Like Vic I normally 'just' send an upated front end, with an update me routine in, which resets any connections of links. if its connecting to a server backend then usulaly there is enough budget to be on site to do the dirty deed or we are using and ADo or DAO conenct, if its a JET back end then it through code that came from the litwin et all 'Developer 2000' book

    you could export the the updated forms / queries etc to another MDB, and get the custoemr site to import them. however you ned to do a lot more testing at your end to make sure you haven't modified anything else that you'd forgotten about. It also depends on the remote site having people who are prepared or able to open up an Access applciation and do something.. after all as others have said elsewhere Access isnt a real piece of sftware ist just for script kiddies not real developers...... as if.

    Personally Deploying a new front end is the preferable solution in my books.. why? you have confidence it will work. Going on site is probably better if you have doubts about your code or the calibre of the staff on the customer site. If you have faith in the customer site then getting them to do the import can work fine. but you have to bear in mind if they screw it up its undoubtedly going to be your fault even if you gave them step by step instructions, that any muppet could understand.

    just thinking aloud.... I know you can programaticaly change stuff in an MDB (eg add queries, change tables and so on), I'm jut wondering if you can create a connection to another MDB within a different MDB (say an update MDB) and modify the target MDB by opening the appropriate tables/reports/whatever collections?
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    348
    Sorry I haven't gotten back to you guys in a timely manner. Your input is very appreciated. i just got swept up in one of those run away projects.

    I realize that Access isn't a real DBMS but simply a tool/toy but I'm not yet to the point that I'm quite ready to move past it but am interested in learning how. The folks I'm working with are barely comfortable with Access itself not to mention to world of possibilities beyond it.
    The folks who are doing the actual update of whatever I create in Access are our IT folks. They have made it more than clear to me that they don't understand Access, I'm not sure how I feel about that. They have a different physical location and a different set of shared directories which is why I don't have the option of personally working in the live file. The good news is that I will be on site periodically and can do some of the updates personally or at least check up on and fix things. The primary customer is my own department (don't ask me how that all works) they will complain if it blows up.
    Interesting idea to have a replaceable face DB that simply point points to "backend" mdb. I'll have to give that a shot. Thanks very much. I think I could get them to stash them in the same folder and just put a shortcut out for people to find. It's taken a while but people are starting to understand the hows and whys of emailing shortcuts rather than files where I work.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    520
    healdem,
    just thinking aloud.... I know you can programaticaly change stuff in an MDB (eg add queries, change tables and so on), I'm jut wondering if you can create a connection to another MDB within a different MDB (say an update MDB) and modify the target MDB by opening the appropriate tables/reports/whatever collections?
    Although I have never done what you were thinking aloud about, I see no reason why it could not be done. I have done all sorts of things inside an Excel spreadsheet from Access VBA, and the same thing with Word, from Access VBA. So, really, if it can be done within Access, then another Access DB, or Word VBA, or Excel VBA, or most any other platform should be able to create an instance of Access, open the target database, and make the appropriate changes in that database.

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