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Thread: password mask

  1. #1
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    Unanswered: password mask

    Hi,

    I put a password mask on a field in one of my tables so people couldn't see
    the data in that field when they open the table.

    The problem I've run into is, now when I make a query, it also shows the password mask when I do a query on that field. I want it to show the data in the results, not *********.
    Anyone know how to fix this problem ?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Generally, the only people I let see the actual tables in my databases, is me and any other admin. That way, I can just store straight data in the tables, and format it on forms if I want to there.

    So for your case, I'd remove the mask on the table end, and create a form in Datasheet view for your users. Your query will still return regularly formatted text, but when your users want to view the Datasheet form, they'll still only see password masks.

    See attached for an example.

    A side note: Why are you querying for passwords?
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Me.Geek = True

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by nckdryr
    A side note: Why are you querying for passwords?
    I don't use the fields for literally for passwords, I just use the password mask to prevent users from seeing that particular field.
    It's a quick and easy way to fix a problem I had, but now it is messing up my querys

    Actually, your idea won't work either, thanks anyways.

    The problem I have is users have to edit data in a form, BUT, in order to do so, they must have access to opening
    the table, because Access (unfortunately) has the user rights for tables set up so that if a user can read a table, they MUST
    also be able to see the table
    Which means they can open the table and see all the data in all the fields. This is why I used the mask.

    It would be GREAT if they'd fix access so you could give users rights to read/write to a table (in a form), but NOT
    be able to look at the table.
    Last edited by Pathology; 06-05-07 at 11:37.

  4. #4
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    Oh I see...
    Where would they see this field in the first place?
    In this situation you should hide the field in the presentation layer of your database - not at table level.
    George
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pathology
    The problem I have is users have to edit data in a form, BUT, in order to do so, they must have access to opening
    the table, because Access (unfortunately) has the user rights for tables set up so that if a user can read a table, they MUST
    also be able to see the table
    Maybe I don't understand what you're saying/trying to do, but my users can edit data in a form, but they're never allowed to open the actual table itself. I use forms to control what they do and do not see (and how they see it), and tables just simply store data.
    Me.Geek = True

  6. #6
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    I think the problem lies in the fact that Pathology has put a password mask on a field that is not a password. She does not normally want users to see this field so at the time it sounded like a good idea.
    Eg I have a field which stores an employees salary - to hide the values to the public I apply a password mask. However I now want to create a query where this data will be visible...

    Solution: remove the mask on the table and apply it everwhere on the presentation layer (or remove the field from the recordsource etc - depends on how you're displaying your data).

    I hope this makes sense
    George
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by nckdryr
    I use forms to control what they do and do not see (and how they see it), and tables just simply store data.
    That's what I was trying to get at
    George
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by nckdryr
    Maybe I don't understand what you're saying/trying to do, but my users can edit data in a form, but they're never allowed to open the actual table itself. I use forms to control what they do and do not see (and how they see it), and tables just simply store data.
    How do you do this ?

    I tried setting up a table so that users couldn't look at it, but I couldn't get that to work.
    If I give a user no rights to a table, then they can't use the form because they can't read from the table.

    Then if I try giving a user just "read" rights to a table, Access automatically checks off design as well; then they can open the table,
    which I don't want.

  9. #9
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    I think the reference is to database splitting - your tables are in the backend and your interface to the data is a separate front end. This is the most frequently (and arueably the best) way of "hiding" things from the user.
    George
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgev
    I think the reference is to database splitting - your tables are in the backend and your interface to the data is a separate front end. This is the most frequently (and arueably the best) way of "hiding" things from the user.
    How do I do this ? You have to forgive me, I'm kind of a noob at this.

  11. #11
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    Not a "noob" but a "newb"
    Tools > Database Utilities > Database Splitter
    Have a play but MAKE SURE YOU BACKUP FIRST!
    HTH
    George
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  12. #12
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    Oh I think I see now.

    So, for example, split the database. Put the backend database (tables) in a separate folder.
    Then give the users rights to the file, but not to open the folder.

    Something like that ?


    I also just noticed a problem with splitting a database. After I split it, the new back-end
    database with the tables is insecure itself !
    The new database reverts its security to the System.mdw provided with the program,
    instead of keeping the user rights it originally had. So now, anyone that opens the
    back-end database has full access to everything.
    Any way around that problem ?
    Last edited by Pathology; 06-05-07 at 13:45.

  13. #13
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    Also, after you update the links in the front end, then you can view the tables and all their data in their full glory all over again.
    So I'm not so sure that splitting a database helps with this problem.

  14. #14
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    Now you have it split - convert the front end into an "MDE"
    Or do you convert the un-split into MDE?
    I forget...
    BACK UP FIRST
    I think it's the first suggestion.
    George
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  15. #15
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    Thanks anyways; I guess that won't work either for what I need.

    It boils down to simply solving the original problem.
    When I use a password mask to mask a field in a table; it also masks query results (which I don't want). If there's no way to fix this particular problem, it would be nice if Microsoft would in the future

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