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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    32

    Unanswered: Dual Core Processor

    We are in process of moving to 64 bit HP servers with sql2005 standard edition. We were just wondering which is better option, to get a server with 2 dual core processor or to get a srver with just 4 processor? How does SQL2005 handle the hypertheading of dual processor?

    Thanks,

    Carlos

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    210
    Quote Originally Posted by carloarango
    We are in process of moving to 64 bit HP servers with sql2005 standard edition. We were just wondering which is better option, to get a server with 2 dual core processor or to get a srver with just 4 processor? How does SQL2005 handle the hypertheading of dual processor?

    Thanks,

    Carlos
    How about a Quad processor?

    First; it will reduce the load on the mother board's Memory Bus. AMD's data-sheet on 4-core mention that "competitors" (Intel) behave more like two duo-core processors on the same backplane, but I'm not sure how far that goes but it implies that performance wise (at the hardware layer) that Intel 2-Core is similar to two 2-Core processors.

    Second; Microsoft only counts it as a single CPU. So; anything licensed (from MS) by CPU will save substantially on licensing fees.

    I don't have the link, so here's the quote:

    SQL Server Multicore Licensing Policy
    Published: August 1, 2005

    Multicore processors, which consist of multiple processing execution
    units or "cores" on one chip, promise to boost computing power, allowing
    servers, workstations, and PCs to perform more functions simultaneously.
    By the end of 2006, Intel expects more than 80 percent of its server
    products to be shipping with multicore technology. Because most
    server-side software is licensed "per processor," it has caused
    confusion among some software vendors regarding whether to charge their
    customers "per processor" or "per core."

    Microsoft has been driving thought leadership in this area by charging
    the same amount per processor, regardless of how many cores are in the
    processor. Microsoft was the first database vendor to make this
    announcement, in October of 2004, and continues to be the only vendor to
    date that has taken this position. This strategy is based on the belief
    that multicore processors are a natural extension of Moore's Law (that
    the number of transistors on a chip doubles about every one to two
    years), and that the benefits should be passed on directly to customers.

    For example, if you are using SQL Server Enterprise Edition on a
    four-processor server with dual-core processors, using all eight cores
    (two cores x four processors), you will require only four processor
    licenses. That can mean substantial savings for customers of Microsoft
    compared to its competitors.
    Last edited by vich; 08-03-07 at 19:49.

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