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Thread: Sharepoint

  1. #1
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    Unanswered: Sharepoint

    Anyone ever heard of or use this, and how does it talk to sql server?
    Brett
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  2. #2
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    Yes, I have heard of SharePoint and it does talk indirectly to SQL Server.

    -PatP

  3. #3
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    Thanks Pat, already been to that site
    Brett
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    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  4. #4
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    We have that here. Something over 300GB of documents scattered all over the place. You will want to have the Sharepoint Admins in tight control of this thing, or it will just become a nearly unusable heap of files stuffed in databases. One thing we learned the hard way was that you should not allow any of the content databases to grow over 25GB in size. Then you start getting concurrency problems. At least you do in Sharepoint 2003, they may have improved that in 2007.

  5. #5
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    We use Sharepoint (we are Microsoft Gold Partners, so we use lots of MS stuff), and the data is stored on MSSQL Server, but I have not had much involvement with it.
    If you have a specific question I could track down an answer from one of my colleagues.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Kaiser
    Anyone ever heard of or use this, and how does it talk to sql server?
    The problem comes in isolating just what do you mean by the term "it"" in your question. Sharepoint stores mountains of stuff in the one to three databases that form the core of the system, and this communication is done deep inside the bowels of the Sharepoint server (although bits and pieces of it are proxied for Sharepoint via the IIS server that supports it). Other "its" in the picture can be sharepoint applets, pannels, controls, and the new thingies called widgets... Other "its" that can be of interest are VBA scripts, ASP pages, and various sniglets of code that can be attached to SharePoint in obscure ways.

    Which "it" or "its" are you referring to in your question?

    -PatP

  7. #7
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    i happen to remember an issue at one of my jobs where I was migrating databases to a new server and since Sharepoint was not my responsibility I knew nothing about it and I went and moved it along with everything else. Evidently there are some special steps that need to be taken when moving the sharepoint databases and the "sharepoint" guy did not bring this to my attention and when the databases were moved, it messed a bunch of sharepoint stuff up. I do not remember all of the details...
    “If one brings so much courage to this world the world has to kill them or break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” Earnest Hemingway, A Farewell To Arms.

  8. #8
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    One of the databases (the config database) contains the locations of the content databases. Even if Sharepoint can be pointed to the new config database, the config database tells sharepoint to look for the content databases in the old location. You don't happen to remember how everything eventually got moved, do you? We are looking at a hardware upgrade on a sharepoint instance, and I do not think Microsoft has gotten back to us on how to do it, yet.

  9. #9
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    no. it was a while ago and I was not the one who straightened it out. i was just responsible for unwittingly hosing everything even though everyone, including the sharepoint guy, was aware of the migration.
    “If one brings so much courage to this world the world has to kill them or break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” Earnest Hemingway, A Farewell To Arms.

  10. #10
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    Great...war stories....

    Any idea if NOT using sharepoint is a better idea?

    I mean, what does sharepoint bring to the table that I can't build myself?
    Brett
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  11. #11
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    SharePoint is HOT

    Some of you guys need to get your heads out of the sand. Where have you been the last four years? SharePoint is one of the hottest, if not THE hottest, enterprise software products on the market right now.

    Companies all over the world have been implementing it and going nuts about it. From a business standpoint it can have a dramatic impact on the productivity of office workers. It is a set of outstanding collaboration tools for the masses. It integrates very tightly with Microsoft Office. It most definitely uses SQL Server as its data store.

    So, if you are a SQL Server DBA, you need to start boning up on SharePoint, or the industry is going to leave you behind.

    I am the Founder and President of a 20 person IT consulting company. We are growing very rapidly and our business is based 100% around SharePoint.

    Wall Street is starting to understand the significance of SharePoint. Take a look at this recent news:

    http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/p...ess%20Releases

  12. #12
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    I'm not arguing against SharePoint, I actually like it for many of the things that it does well.

    The problem is that Brett and I have been around long enough to see dozens, perhaps hundreds of "application frameworks" the are conceptually similar to SharePoint that we don't immediately jump on the bandwagon when a new one comes along. CICS was once supposed to bring nearly every benefit that SharePoint proposes, as were several of CICS' predecessors and successors. Old foggies like us tend to be rather jaded!

    SharePoint can very quickly make companies go nuts. If someone takes the time to properly set the executives expectations AND those executives invest in proper training and mentoring for their developers, then SharePoint can be a very productive tool.

    To use SharePoint at the Enterprise level also requires some significant investment in infrastructure. I wouldn't consider trying to administer a SharePoint enviornment without MOM because I don't think that an Enterprise level SharePoint farm can be run without it. I also think that a NAS or SAN environment is necessary, and at least one full time administrator (usually more) is necessary for an Enterprise level SharePoint configuration.

    You can run SharePoint on a much smaller scale (down even to a workgroup), but doing so means that you've invested a lot into a product, and I can't see how you could get enough value to justify that investment.

    -PatP

  13. #13
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    I'm an old guy too. 26 years in the industry. So, I hear what you are saying. And, no question about it - way too many products come and go. (I was a CICS programmer back in the early 80's ).

    Nevertheless, this product is going to go down in history as one of the big ones. I think trick for IT professionals is judging which products are going to be flashes in the pan and which ones are going to be big ones. I think this is one of the few that is going to fall into the "big one" category.

    All of the other things you said about governance and Executive buy-in and understanding are absolutely right on target. Without that, you will end up with a big mess - no question about it.

    On the farm administration side, that can be a challenge as well depending on how large your organization is. Right now, the biggest deployment in the world is at Microsoft itself. They have five SharePoint server farms deployed around the world and have anywhere from 10 - 20 servers in each farm. Of course, they are using very expensive SAN environment to support those as well.

    Because of SQL Server and ASP.NET and the emphasis the development team put on developing a well-performing product, SharePoint 2003 and SharePoint 2007 scale very well. We have seen organizations with 500 - 1000 employees have respectible performance with a two-server farm. One server is referred to as the Web Front-End and runs web application and the search and indexing components. The other server is a standalone SQL Server. Of course, both servers have multiple processors, lots of RAM and fast drives. But, nevertheless, servers that cost under 20K each.

  14. #14
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    OK, Let's do this again

    what does sharepoint bring to the table that I can't build myself?
    Heard lot's of sunshine being blown out there, so what, in concrete value does sharepoint add.

    We currently have 0 in house resources for this and it sounds like a very large endeavor, which at an enterprise level would/should be rolled out across all business lines to realize any benefit
    Brett
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    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

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    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  15. #15
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    and who said anything about being "old". I'd like to claim wiser, but...well never mind
    Brett
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    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
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    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

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