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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,074

    Unanswered: NUMBER(p,s) question

    So, I was looking through the documentation to see what the difference between NUMBER and INTEGER was, and I came across this def'n of NUMBER which confuses me:

    Code:
    NUMBER(p,s) Number having precision p and scale s. The precision p 
    can range from 1 to 38. The scale s can range from -84 to 127.
    How could you ever store a value like

    NUMBER (38,127)

    It just doesn't make sense to me, these limits, knowing how "p" & "s" behave.

    --=cf

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    2,713

    Talking


    Chuck, read the next paragraphs of the manual:
    NUMBER(p,s)

    where:

    • p is the precision, or the total number of significant decimal digits, where the most significant digit is the left-most nonzero digit, and the least significant digit is the right-most known digit. Oracle guarantees the portability of numbers with precision of up to 20 base-100 digits, which is equivalent to 39 or 40 decimal digits depending on the position of the decimal point.

    • s is the scale, or the number of digits from the decimal point to the least significant digit. The scale can range from -84 to 127.


      • Positive scale is the number of significant digits to the right of the decimal point to and including the least significant digit.

      • Negative scale is the number of significant digits to the left of the decimal point, to but not including the least significant digit. For negative scale the least significant digit is on the left side of the decimal point, because the actual data is rounded to the specified number of places to the left of the decimal point. For example, a specification of (10,-2) means to round to hundreds.

    Scale can be greater than precision, most commonly when e notation is used. When scale is greater than precision, the precision specifies the maximum number of significant digits to the right of the decimal point. For example, a column defined as NUMBER(4,5) requires a zero for the first digit after the decimal point and rounds all values past the fifth digit after the decimal point.


    The person who says it can't be done should not interrupt the person doing it. -- Chinese proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,074
    weirdness. Thanks for pointing me to the answer ---=cf

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