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  1. #1
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    Jul 2003
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    Unanswered: Is SQL Server Express enough for me?

    I'm trying to figure this one out. I'm currently on a shared SQL Server 2000 db. I'm almost at my limits in terms of size (300-500mb). I'm shrinking the log file constantly.

    I plan on moving everything over to MySQL, but it's going to take time. I think I need a temporary solution, and I'm just not sure if SQL Server Express will be able do the trick.

    Obviously, I'm under db size limit. I have no idea if the db running on 1gb ram and 1cpu is enough though, and I have no idea how to test outside of just chucking it up under real world conditions.

    Anyone have any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    500mb is nothing

    good luck with mySQL..this site runs on it

    Why are you so limited in space?
    Brett
    8-)

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    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  3. #3
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    I never wanted to run my own SQL Server, and getting some shared SQL Server space from my datacenter was a cost efficient way of doing things (plus, they handled backups, maintenance, etc).

    However, my space has basically run out, my web server is starting to go (and I might be switching datacenters), and I don't think I can convert to MySQL so fast, so I'm hoping to just use Express for a few months. I realize space isn't an issue, but have zero clue about the ram/cpu limitations, or how Express runs when being used with a decently trafficked site.

  4. #4
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    i haven't had the privilege of having a site that was that big, but wouldn't the obvious step be to move up from shared to dedicated at your same host?

    that way you keep the same support team, backup procedures, etc.

    if you run express, you'll be on your own as far as applying patches etc.

    migrating to mysql is a definite option (the sql server guys in this forum are going to just say "shut up rudy" again, but mysql continues to blow the socks off legacy products as far as large web sites go)

    however, you cannot just switch to mysql, there will be a lot more to the conversion than you think, and you are right not to do it "so fast"
    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
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  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Have you considered Oracle Express, the entry-level database produced by the World's largest enterprise software company, and leading supplier of database software.
    Bessie Braddock: Winston, you are drunk!
    Churchill: And Madam, you are ugly. And tomorrow, I'll be sober, and you will still be ugly.

  6. #6
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    robert, that conversion would be even costlier and longer term than the conversion to mysql

    he has a high volume and very active live site

    hardly entry-level
    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
    Buy my SitePoint book: Simply SQL

  7. #7
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    Rudy,

    I recommended Oracle based on the fact that it has superior functionality and performance with respect to concurrency, which I feel would be a key consideration for a high traffic website.

    I do apologize if my comment may have been viewed as inappropriate in the context.

    Regards,
    Bessie Braddock: Winston, you are drunk!
    Churchill: And Madam, you are ugly. And tomorrow, I'll be sober, and you will still be ugly.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    22
    Quote Originally Posted by r937
    i haven't had the privilege of having a site that was that big, but wouldn't the obvious step be to move up from shared to dedicated at your same host?

    that way you keep the same support team, backup procedures, etc.

    if you run express, you'll be on your own as far as applying patches etc.

    migrating to mysql is a definite option (the sql server guys in this forum are going to just say "shut up rudy" again, but mysql continues to blow the socks off legacy products as far as large web sites go)

    however, you cannot just switch to mysql, there will be a lot more to the conversion than you think, and you are right not to do it "so fast"
    I'm definitely moving to mysql. It's just a matter of when. All I have are dedicated servers for my websites, but this one site needed a SQL Server db back then and I didn't need to have my own dedicated SQL Server db. For the amount of time I plan on having it stay on SQL Server, it'd probably still be a waste - plus, the moment I'm off their shared, I get none of the benefits, I'm just on my own no matter what.

    I don't mind applying patches, doing backups, it's the "wtf is wrong now?" issue I don't want to run into - however, if Express will handle what I need, I might risk that for the cost of just having it on there for a month or so while I figure out my mysql transition.

    The db itself is actually rather "basic". It's just standard data housing and a few simple stored procedures (at least imo). Porting to mysql shouldn't be too complex. I don't knoq mysql stored proc syntax (big issue), and then I just have to comb the site and look for errors so I can tweak any sql statements (should be minor, but could be tedious). Again, it's mostly just timing.
    Quote Originally Posted by r123456
    Have you considered Oracle Express, the entry-level database produced by the World's largest enterprise software company, and leading supplier of database software.
    Nope, I don't know a thing about managing an Oracle server.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by r123456
    Have you considered Oracle Express, the entry-level database produced by the World's largest enterprise software company, and leading supplier of database software.

    you funny

    This message is too short
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
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    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  10. #10
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    Provided Answers: 54
    Quote Originally Posted by r123456
    Have you considered Oracle Express, the entry-level database produced by the World's largest enterprise software company, and leading supplier of database software.
    If you consider Oracle to be the only supplier of enterprise software, then I'll conceed that Oracle is the worlds largest supplier of Oracle software. If you look at the real world, there are more copies of both Microsoft and IBM products today in more companies around the world than Oracle could dream of publishing even if they gave their software away.

    The same is true of Oracle database products

    Neither of your points helps solve the problem of the original poster. Please stay on topic.

    -PatP

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