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  1. #1
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    Unanswered: Oracle Connections

    HI,
    I am investigating a Java Application and which is using connection pooling ( I think it is C3PO) and an Oracle database. I wish to see whn the thread actually uses the connection and when it is not using it (i.e. it is free back in the pool), anybody any ideas, cheers

  2. #2
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    Exactly what does the question have to do with Oracle?
    The answer will be the same regardless to which flavor of RDBMS (Oracle, DB2, SQLServer, etc.) the connection is made.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by anacedent
    Exactly what does the question have to do with Oracle?
    The answer will be the same regardless to which flavor of RDBMS (Oracle, DB2, SQLServer, etc.) the connection is made.
    That's a well made point and I think you are absolutely correct.
    Once I have a pool, Oracle does not know if a connection in that pool is in use or not so my question makes no sense. what would happened if I had no pool and my application was just using JDBC connections to talk to Oracle.

    Is there anything I could check in Oracle to get an idea of connection being used? Surely Oracle has some knowledge of sessions etc?

    Any help appreciated.

  4. #4
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    What we have here is a failure to communicate.

    ANY, Any, any SQL query that is initiated by the client & processed by Oracle ipso fact, by default & is intuitively obvious a connection exists.
    So by the mere fact Oracle process the SQL, a connection exists.
    So once again, what exactly are you asking?

    IF a client does NOT issue any SQL, does Oracle have to respond?

    What is the question & what answer do you expect Oracle to return?
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by anacedent
    What we have here is a failure to communicate.

    ANY, Any, any SQL query that is initiated by the client & processed by Oracle ipso fact, by default & is intuitively obvious a connection exists.
    So by the mere fact Oracle process the SQL, a connection exists.
    So once again, what exactly are you asking?

    IF a client does NOT issue any SQL, does Oracle have to respond?

    What is the question & what answer do you expect Oracle to return?
    I have using hibernate's implementation of JPA, I am trying to determine when hibernate begins to use a connection e.g. at the beginning of the web request, when I invoke commit or when?
    I need to know this so I can get an idea of how the application will scale.
    i.e. if hibernate hangs onto to connections for longer periods of time, the application will need more connections.

    Hibernate doesn't say when it will use the connection. One could assume it is smart and only uses one when it needs to, but I'd like to have some visibility. Connection usage isn't part of the JPA contract, so I am trying to dig a big deeper here.

    Ok, apologies if my explanations are not good but they are not that bad either.
    Thanks for your time.

  6. #6
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    > at the beginning of the web request,
    As a general rule, Oracle RDBMS does NOT "talk" to any browser client directly.
    I applaud your desire to understand the scalability of what you are implementing, but it appears you don't know, what you don't know.
    I know from first hand (ab)use that Hibernate is an Oracle hostile interface
    & I have the mental scars to prove it.
    FWIW - Hibernate out of the box scales as well as a pig flies.
    I pity the DBA supporting the deployed application.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by anacedent
    > at the beginning of the web request,
    As a general rule, Oracle RDBMS does NOT "talk" to any browser client directly.
    I know that.

    the archiecture is
    Web front end: JSF / Seam
    Backend: Seam / Java / JPA (using Hibernate implementation).
    Database: Oracle

    I didn't think I'd have to explain the architecture.

    I applaud your desire to understand the scalability of what you are implementing, but it appears you don't know, what you don't know.
    Example please?

    I know from first hand (ab)use that Hibernate is an Oracle hostile interface
    & I have the mental scars to prove it.
    Right now, I have about 1,000 regression tests for a single user and all is fine, I just need to investigate scalability.

    FWIW - Hibernate out of the box scales as well as a pig flies.
    I pity the DBA supporting the deployed application.
    Kind of lost you now. Perhaps if you like to give technical info please do.
    Or if you like to leave this thread and let others contribute do that.

    Thanks again.

  8. #8
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    You can NOT ask Oracle about the "state" of a connection, because a connection must exist in order for Oracle to provide ANY response.
    Your "observation platform" needs to be at the Operating System level & external to Oracle itself.
    Early on in product development at my site, Hibernate "connection pooling" was not really pooling.
    I am not clear on whether that was Hibernate's fault or the duhveloper's fault.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

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