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  1. #1
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    Feb 2008
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    Unanswered: SQL Server 2005 Failover Cluster Install tips

    I've never performed this type of installation. Any tips/ tricks you could provide would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Does Failover cluster install in 2005 require analysis services, or is it an option?

  4. #4
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    Aug 2005
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    It's an option. Only install it if you need it.
    --wayne
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  5. #5
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    Dec 2002
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    1. If you're not installing from CD/DVD, be sure that the folder structure for the installation binaries is correct (ie, top level folder with a folder called Servers and a folder called Tools).

    2. Log in only to one of the two nodes during the installation process; be sure that no one is logged in to the other (console or T/S). This may be superstition on my part, but I swear it caused the failure the first three times I tried it.

    3. Be sure you know which components are included with the cluster installation and are installed automatically on the second node and which will require you to log in to the second node and perform a separate install. Ie:

    a. Notification Services
    b. Integration Services
    c. Client Tools

    4. If you're going to run Integration Services on your cluster, be sure you read the KB article on how to properly cluster it. It's not hard, but it's not intuitive if you come from the SQL 2000 world.

    5. Be sure you know how to change the default connection settings for SQL Server Configuration Manager.

    6. Test ALL the services for failover.

    7. NEVER use the services console to start and stop clustered services; use the cluster administration mmc.

    8. [Edit] Be sure you know where the log files are for each of the various installation processes (ie, RTM, SPs and HotFixes). Each has a separate directory. They can be a pain to find (and even more painful to read).

    Have fun!

    hmscott
    Have you hugged your backup today?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    21
    HmScott,

    This is good info, thanks! Are these needed for a failover enviornment?
    a. Notification Services
    b. Integration Services
    c. Client Tools

    I just want to stick to installing the SQL instances and mgmt studio. Is this suffecient?

    Is this install more complex when considering RAID/San enviornment?

    This install doesn't sound like much fun...but I will try... :-)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    1,245
    Quote Originally Posted by newbieal
    HmScott,

    This is good info, thanks! Are these needed for a failover enviornment?
    a. Notification Services
    b. Integration Services
    c. Client Tools

    I just want to stick to installing the SQL instances and mgmt studio. Is this suffecient?

    Is this install more complex when considering RAID/San enviornment?
    If you use Notification Services or Integration Services, then you need to install them on the failover server. If you don't use them, then don't install them on either server. Client and/or workstation

    I'm not sure where to go with your question regarding RAID/SAN. You have to have some sort of shared storage component with a cluster. You'll need to be familiar with setting up shared storage (using either external SCSI or SAN). Personally, I prefer SAN, but you need to be prepared to shell out some $$$.

    Regards,

    hmscott
    Have you hugged your backup today?

  8. #8
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    Feb 2008
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    I am not in charge of the hardware aspect nor OS aspect of it, so I'm not familiar with SAN. But I believe that is what will be used in for this envriornment. What should I know specifically when installing the failover clusters in this type of enviornment?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    1,245
    Quote Originally Posted by newbieal
    I am not in charge of the hardware aspect nor OS aspect of it, so I'm not familiar with SAN. But I believe that is what will be used in for this envriornment. What should I know specifically when installing the failover clusters in this type of enviornment?
    Read through the Windows Server 2003 clustering guide. Make sure that you fully understand what clustering is (HA failover) and is not (load balancing).

    The only gotcha beyond that is that if you have multiple disks in the cluster resource group for your SQL Server, they will not show up "automagically". You have to edit the properties of the SQL Server cluster resource to add dependencies to the other disks (meaning besides the disk which you selected for the data files). This is a pain because it is not intuitive.

    As for not being the OS guy, I can understand, but you need (in my opinion) to be best buddies with the OS guy. And your second best buddy needs to be the storage guy (or whoever runs the SAN). Databases live and die on storage and OS. Be sure that you are intimately involved in the layout of the SAN and installation/maintenance of the OS.

    Regards,

    hmscott
    Have you hugged your backup today?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    21
    Good information, thanks. I'm nervous about this install but it looks like it takes a lot of reading and preparation and I should be ok.

    Anything else you can think of that a newbie (first-time ever sql failover cluster install) like me needs to know?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    75
    one thing worth noting - if you EVER decide you want to add Analysis Svcs, best bet is to do it now. It is possible to add clustered Analysis Svcs after the fact, but you'll need to have dedicated disks and cluster resources (IP, Resource Group) specifically for it. The only way you can ever (easily) have DB Services and Analysis Svcs coexisting on the same share disks is if they're installed at the same time.

    I had to rebuild one of my 2005 clusters last year for this exact reason.

    When setting up the Cluster groups, just add the disk resources to the appropriate groups - don't give it an IP address or a Network name. SQL Server setup will do all that for you and will bitch and moan if you decide to do it beforehand.

    Also, this might be obvious, but make sure your Storage guy knows best practices RAID setups for SQL Data/logs and not just toss you a big RAID 5 to have to deal with. Perfmon will thank you later.
    Last edited by jeebustrain; 02-14-08 at 18:11.

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