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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    72

    Unanswered: Untidy databases

    Hello

    I use two different databases for one Web site with 4 or 5 different tables. This is not ideal - it is just the way the site has evolved - but I wondered if there would be any advantage in combining the different tables into one database.

    In one table in one database I have details of site visitors (location, etc); in another table I have IP addresses (meaning that I have more IP addresses that site visitor details because not every site visitor fills in my online form (from which I obtain their details), and another table in another database stores the amount of hits the site receives.

    Everything seems to work, but it I feel as if the folder which holds my databases on the server is a bit untidy.

    Thanks for any suggestions.

    Steve

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Mpls/St.Paul area
    Posts
    303
    If you want to learn about the website statistics you have to open three files? If all the information is related to one theme, I would put the tables in one database. It sounds like the current situation is analogous to having the header and greeting of a letter in one document, and the body of the letter in another document.
    • Is there are reason to keep them seperate because of security/access/permissions?
    • Is there are reason to keep them seperate because of performance?
    • Can you test it before you deploy it?


    good luck.
    John
    This is the day the Lord has made, I will rejoice and be glad in it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    4,049
    Well I would put them in the same database just because it's untidy ^^
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    72
    Hello StartTrecker

    Thanks for your reply.

    I also thought I might be able to 'relate' the tables in some way, in that one table records the amount of hits, while another table records the IP address of that same 'hit', if you know what I mean.

    Steve

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    4,049
    Yup, that's a perfectly good reason to join the tables in one database
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    72
    Hello Star Trecker

    Would you know of a useful, basic tutorial I could read on how best to do it? I am using classic ASP with Access 2000.

    Many thanks again for your time.

    Steve

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    4,049
    Unfortunately I don't... and I don't know ASP well enough to suggest anything. I could help with the Access side of it, but I don't think that's enough help for you to start

    If I were forced to guess, I'd say you need to merge the tables into one database and then do search and replace across your ASP code to replace you obsolete database names with the one single db.
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    4,049
    Oh and there's no "C" in StarTrekker!!! ^^
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    11,434
    Provided Answers: 10
    Hey Steve, sounds to me like you need a database design 101.

    This article goes into more depth than needed for this particular problem but it is certainly worth the read.

    www.r937.com/relational.html
    Quote Originally Posted by Quetzal
    Would you know of a useful, basic tutorial I could read on how best to do it?
    And that's a very wide scope of a question; so the answer is 42

    If the Hitch hikers guide to the galaxy taught me anything: you can't expect an answer if you yourself do not know the question!
    George
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