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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Jersey
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    10,322

    Unanswered: SSMS is a piece of....

    Junk

    OK, I have all of my SS2k sproc scripts saved as

    owner.sprocname.prc

    Because EM scripted them out that way

    Now that we are using MS, it doesn't recognize the script, it doesn't highlight the code, and doesn't connect to a server

    Can a change this somewhere?

    I've got all of my scripts in pvcs as *.prc and I'd rather not have to change it

    Any ideas?
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
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    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    Jersey
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    oh, come on, no one?
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    Provided Answers: 54
    The problem comes from the fact that PRC is now used as the extension for a SQL Server Replication Snapshot. You can't use one extension two ways, so you'll have to decide whether it is more important that you keep your machine(s) able to deal with the present generation of tools or if you want to maintain compatability with previous versions of tools. This choice stinks, and it isn't an easy one to make. I didn't discover this little gem until after SQL 2005 went to production, but I've been unhappy about it since the day that I found it.

    To fix the problem, in Windows Exploder (explorer for the purists).
    1) Click the Tools menu
    2) Clice the "Folder Options" menuitem
    3) Click the File Types tab
    4) Navigate to the SQL file type
    5) Click the Change button
    6) Note the present assignment, probably Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio
    7) Click the Cancel button
    8) Click the New button
    9) Enter PRC for the file type
    10) Click the Advanced button
    11) Select SQL Script File
    12) Press Ok
    13) Listen to it howl and rage about replacing the file extension. Do whatever dance is needed to navigate the brohouha.
    14) Click the Change Button
    15) Click Open With
    16) Click Select program From List
    17) Click Ok
    18) Do the necessary dance to associate the new file type with the application from step #6. This can vary from machine to machine.

    -PatP

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    on the wrong server
    Posts
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    Provided Answers: 6
    just rename the files.

    i am sure this can be scripted. I think I did once myself.

    I will trade you your SQL 2005 SSMS for my TFS 2005 Code Analysis BS any day of the week.

    How's MySQL on your apple treating you. I have to get with that myself.
    “If one brings so much courage to this world the world has to kill them or break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” Earnest Hemingway, A Farewell To Arms.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    In a large office with bad lighting
    Posts
    1,040
    If you decide you want to rename all your scripts to end in .sql there is a niice free little tool called MULTIREN that was published by PC magazine a few years ago.

    You can google it to see all the hits, or follow this link: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2704,27023,00.asp

    -- This is all just a Figment of my Imagination --

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Jersey
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    10,322
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

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