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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    South Dakota
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    267

    Unanswered: Front/Back End suggestions & guidelines

    To All--

    I'm about to embark on my first experience developing a database solution where Access is the front end and back end. I'm looking for some general suggestions, guidelines, or pitfalls to avoid in the development process.

    For example, I've seen a lot of posts referencing using Unbound forms when making the front end. Why? Is this done to avoid record locking issues?

    Anything you can offer would be of great help. Now's the time to rant and rave (or just outright argue) your thoughts about the design. Thanks for you time and help.

    C

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Nevada, USA
    Posts
    2,888
    Provided Answers: 6
    Actually using unbound forms would create record locking issues (if defined as avoiding 2 users editing the same record at the same time). Jet will automatically control that with a bound form. With an unbound form, you have to code it.

    In general, I would stick with bound forms. Unbound forms give you more control, but are a lot more work to set up. I only use unbound forms in special circumstances.
    Paul

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Madison, WI
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    Unbound forms are best used when you have many users accessing the data in a client-server atmosphere and your dataset is fairly large. Keep in mind that designing unbound forms means more development time (2-3 times longer as you need to create functions to save, retrieve, delete data from/to the tables and forms.)

    If you have more than 3-5 users which will be utilizing the Access mdb (at the same time), you should consider unbound forms (as well as a SQL Server backend). If your dataset is in the million size records, you should consider unbound forms (again, as well as a SQL Server backend).

    If you only have 1 or 2 users who will be using the mdb at any one time and your dataset is only a few thousand records, then consider the time you have to develop the application versus using bound forms (but using unbound forms on a small application would be a great time to start learning for larger applications.) Bound forms are quick, easy, and allow you to get smaller applications up and running in no time.

    You can still have record-locking issues using bound forms. The important things to prevent record-locking issues are good table structure design and good form design (whether bound or unbound). As a general rule to avoid locking issues, don't open multiple forms on the same table recordset (at the same time) or design code to write data to the same table recordset (at the same time). For example, opening 2 separate bound forms at the same time which both update data to the same table is most likely going to cause you problems.
    Last edited by pkstormy; 04-07-08 at 16:14.
    Expert Database Programming
    MSAccess since 1.0, SQL Server since 6.5, Visual Basic (5.0, 6.0)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,422
    Provided Answers: 8
    When Link the Backend to the front end I user the \\serverName\database$\data.mdb
    not the Map drivers ( what they can't see thay can't delete)
    make shour the user have full control over the database$ folder

    one of the draw backs
    I found is keeping the User screens (front end) up todate with latest changes
    even created even created a Batch file and email them and they could'nt even click that still got blame for not put the changes live
    in the end I had write a program that checked for updates on the server.
    hope this help

    See clear as mud


    StePhan McKillen
    the aim is store once, not store multiple times
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    4,049
    Quote Originally Posted by pkstormy
    If you have more than 3-5 users which will be utilizing the Access mdb (at the same time), you should consider unbound forms (as well as a SQL Server backend). If your dataset is in the million size records, you should consider unbound forms (again, as well as a SQL Server backend).
    I'd set the limit at around 10 users tbh. Depends on how active the users are I guess.
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

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