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Thread: Table Size

  1. #1
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    Unanswered: Table Size

    Hello!

    How can I find out the size of a table in my Access DB?

  2. #2
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    Hi

    I don't know how to calculate the metadata (there's probably stuff on the web) but you can work out the amount of space your data takes up if you can be bothered. A question in return - Why?
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  3. #3
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    For documentation purposes. My boss wants me to redesign our DB and wants a detailed documentation (including table size) of the old one.

  4. #4
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    in which case
    look at the table
    find how many rows are in it
    go through the table defintion and count the number of bytes
    which is a bit of a pain.
    if you want to go down the maths route
    you need a list of each datatype this gives the gruesome details

    bear in mind that Access always reserves some space for itself, and for indexes, forms reports etc...

    it also needs some working space to allow for inserts and so on. you can reclaim this working space by doing a compact and repair occasionally

    so I'd take your data calculation multiply it by the number of rows expected, then double it.

    the space required for forms & reports is largely unquantifiable.. depends on how the number of such items, how complex they are and so on.

    Id hazard a guess at low medium & high
    say 5Mb for low, 10..15 for medium, 15+ for a high

    HTH

  5. #5
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    I'd just tell my boss that Access can't do that ^^
    Owner and Manager of
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    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  6. #6
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    I would create a new access file, save it and note down it's file size.

    I would then import the table and perform a compact and repair.

    Then I would work out the difference in file size.

    Hey, that's quite an elegant solution for a Monday
    George
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgev
    I would create a new access file, save it and note down it's file size.

    I would then import the table and perform a compact and repair.

    Then I would work out the difference in file size.

    Hey, that's quite an elegant solution for a Monday
    in my books the trouble with that solution is that you have to add each table at a single pass, compact & repair then view the size.....


    I far prefer the Startrekker Solution.
    ... none of your steeekin business, or just scare the blighter with a simple "oooh around 0.5TB"

  8. #8
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    Bah... too many words.

    "Duh... I dunno!" works for me

    Mind you, it's easy for me to say this since I have no boss

    What about this one... Get the size of the database and divide it by the number of tables!
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  9. #9
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    H'm lets see if theres a problem here
    in one app I have around 15 tables with masterfiles / config data in... aomewhere between 10 & 50 records per table, 3 medium sixed tabels around 10....40 rows eachs, and one big FCUK table with 350,000 rows, natch the column definitons mastefiles tables are are tiny, (usually the PK, description & some other stuff around 100 bytes per row), and the monster table is around 800 bytes per row (excluding the memo field)...
    simple division isn't going to work there.

    of course I suppose if you were being cute, and quoting the table size without any data in it then dividing the file size by the number of tables would be a reasonable proposition. however I can imagine the look on aforesaid boss's face when he comes to whinge that the app has just gobbled up all the spare server disk space and you tell 'em it was n bytes with no data in it.....

  10. #10
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    <insert rolleyes smilie!> Duh! I know that; I was joking!!

    I was sarcastically responding to the ever increasingly hypothetical boss and suggesting a humerous way of answering said bosses' request.

    What about a random number for each table?

    Sorry for the misunderstanding
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  11. #11
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    Does that mean "I was being cute"? ?
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

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