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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Unanswered: access2003: any good VBA coding references?

    As much as I'd like to ask for answers to a lot of specific things regarding the DB I'm working on, I can tell that a good code would be a generally good solution.

    Can anyone recommend some good basic online references for understanding the commands and (more importantly) proper syntax for VBA? -something along the lines of "An Access VBA guide for the mentally challenged" would still be greatly appreciated. More than half the time, I'm guessing what the commands do. I'm fine with books too, but the good ones are hard to come by around here.

    I'm learning to code by looking at samples from our own forum codebank and some techonthenet samples. I got some of the basics from: http://allenbrowne.com/casu-22.html.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    I'm self taught, using only help files ^^

    However, if I did buy a book, it would be this one:

    http://www.sybex.com/WileyCDA/SybexT...Id-290546.html
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Provided Answers: 59
    agreed
    any serious Access developer in my books should have the developers handbooks for the version of access they are targetting.

    yes they are pricey but they contain a wealth of information

    the only reservation I have is that they can be a tough read for someone who is just starting out on the db development path. there are some assumptions about knowledge of VBA and db design which the books assume

    lets phraseit this way, when I'm developing in Access I tend to have both copies close to hand, and used at least weekly

    if nothing else there is a wealth of code examples supplied in the book on CD which are freely usable in your own apps.

    HTH
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  4. #4
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    I'm so tempted to buy this book ... tbh, I don't know why I hesitate since it's a tax - deductible expense... Maybe I think I won't benefit as much as others... or maybe I think I might already know most of it... but it's always good to have a good resource on hand. I dunno, I always manage to find a solution on my own or with a little nudge from the 'net.
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    The VBA help facility is quite adequate for grammatical and structural information. The 'how-to' stuff is very variable - some useful, some irritating because its clever for the sake of being clever. (I once had an argument with some C++ programmers because they said I wasn't a good programmer because I did not use all the bells and whistles. My response - commercially maintainable!). I have three books, all for Access 2000 (I don't think VBA has changed much after the big shift from the Access 97 version). "Microsoft Offie 2000 Visual Basic Programmers Guide" has a lot of good explanatory stuff in it which gives you some idea how things work under the covers. "Beginning Access 2000 VBA" (Smith & Sussman, pub.Wrox Press) is good for discussing stylistic, architectural and systemic matters. "VBA Developer's Handbook" (Getz & Gilbert) is very high level, but useful for connecting to Windows, MS OFfice, using add-ins, DLLS and all that stuff.
    The latter two have CDs and hooks into the internet.
    I hope this helps.
    Jim Wright.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by healdem
    any serious Access developer in my books should have the developers handbooks for the version of access they are targetting.
    oh....poop

    Access 2003 VBA help is an excellent read-it-from-start-to-finish introduction (and intermediate) to VBA. It is pretty hopeless as a reference though, which is what it should really be.

    O'Reilly's VB & VBA language reference is nice, but only once you've got a good grasp of the language already.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Thanks for the info! I had half a mind to ask the some of the codebank contributors about what some of the lines mean.

    "yes they are pricey but they contain a wealth of information"
    Shipping books is a killer around here. =D Its actually locating a copy that's hard. Thankfully there's an ISBN for it. Maybe I'll put in an order at one of the bookshops here and see if they can get it (hope there's a stray copy somewhere).

    "the only reservation I have is that they can be a tough read for someone who is just starting out on the db development path. there are some assumptions about knowledge of VBA and db design which the books assume"
    I should get the "for dummies" book too.


    @startrekker
    Self-taught? I'm awed. Should I start feeling bad that my learning curve is slow? T_T;
    Seriously, your VBA is superior. I'll keep studying it too (I won't even be half as good as you though!).
    Last edited by coffeecat; 07-04-08 at 21:19.

  8. #8
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    I used to be a full-time teacher in Access, Excel, VB and various others, so I was in a position of being paid to learn and I simply made the most of it.

    I did have the assistance of the user manual of the wonderful Access 2.0 (lol), which I read some parts several times over. I also studied "Database Design Fundamentals" at what we Aussies call "TAFE" (Technical and Further Education)... so I didn't learn it by "just playing".
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    163
    I am officially going to maim whomever was in charge of keeping records in the office. No one knows where the software manuals are.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Are you sure they came with manuals? These days all the documentation is on the CD/DVD.

    It was a very different world when Access 2.0 came out ^^ Software came with manuals. Dial up modems were at 14.4K or 28.8 if you lashed out... and if you paid megadollars you could have ISDN 64K and we all laughed at this and referred to ISDN as "it still does nothing". Help was installed to your mega-whopping 80MB HDD instead of online... yet it was still called online help. People answered phones instead of machines. E-mail spam was unheard of... and quite a few others that I wont bother going into

    /dreamstate
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  11. #11
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    Jun 2008
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    163
    Actually, no, I'm not sure if they came with manuals. O_o' *crosses fingers*

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    ^.^ I hope you didn't bite someone's head off yet ^^
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    163
    "Yet" would be the key word here. ..nah, I play nice IRL. Though I might sound evil online. >=)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    13
    I have bought many IT books.
    On VB, Java, OLE, COM, compiler design, rdb, ... at least 30 books

    It took me that many books and so much money to come to my conclusion.
    For me, buying is a book has never been useful.
    I have never read or even really used a book.
    At most buying a book has been a kind of self-stimulation.
    Seeing the book on my desk was a kind of reminder that I am interrested in something and that I could have help from it if needed. But never I found a book useful.

    Before the internet, a book was my only way to scratch the surface of an IT subject, just to see if I would go further.
    Mostly I have always found my needs on the web or in online help. Long ago User's manuals or programmer's manual played this role.

  15. #15
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    Jun 2008
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    For me, buying is a book has never been useful.
    Ouch man. =D

    I do admit that a lot of tech-help books are not targeted towards readers without prior knowledge or orientation on the subject. But reference books still do their job. It is a matter of finding the right book for you. I can only advice you to think about what kind of instructional form will suit your learning patterns best, then find a book that has it.

    I hope you reconsider your opinion about books =D

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