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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3

    Unanswered: compare the mysql 5.1 to Oracle 10g XE for Centos 5

    I am starting a small project, which will require to make the concurrent connection to the back end database, the web server is running on centos 5, and I have to make the tough choice between Mysql 5.1 and Oracle 10g XE.
    I didn't see any intensive comparasion between them, especially for some topic like performance and limitations. I believe Mysql didn't set any hard limitation here, but its store procedure is still premature, and its bad reputation for "outer join" like query issue may end up the failure of the whole project.
    Do anyone here has experience of using the Oracle 10g XE on Centos (or RHEL), and if possible, can some one refer me to the article which can break down and make the detailed comparation between them.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Where the Surf Meets the Turf @Del Mar, CA
    Posts
    7,776
    Provided Answers: 1
    If the choice were mine, I'd use MYSQL & I've been doing Oracle for about 15 years.
    MYSQL is much easier to support.
    Of course, since I do PERL I am not dependent upon PL/SQL.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for the reply, I will use the PHP as programming language, will really like to know if someone use Mysql has the struggle to deal with the join, especially the outer join, its performance issue.
    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Where the Surf Meets the Turf @Del Mar, CA
    Posts
    7,776
    Provided Answers: 1
    Outer joins are a function of design & implementation.
    Performance can be a function of size of tables & hardware systems.
    There is no one size fits all answer.
    Anyone who claims otherwise should be asked to provide reproduceable benchmarks.


    Without a whole lot of effort, you can install MYSQL & Oracle on the same hardware,
    & benchmark a "nasty" outer join & compare the results.
    Last edited by anacedent; 08-06-08 at 14:24.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

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