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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2

    How do I get in?

    Ok, here is sad reality. After leaving Russia in 2001 and spending almost 7 years fighting for green card, I emerge victorious over immigration authorities. Now what? I am 32, my profession - research linguist and interpretor, I am not complete technical idiot (can assemble a computer and hook up a network). I am really fast learner and very, very motivated and persistent person.

    A friend of mine got into IT (network administration, security) couple years earlier, so here is what he suggests for me. I want to be data architect (hey, I know that sounds terribly impudent, but I'll get there, believe me one way or another).

    1. Get MCSE and/or MCDBA certified.
    2. Get some practical experience by working as an assistant or an intern.
    3. Write a resume (well, he suggests stretching a few things on it here and there)
    4. Start looking for a job.

    He swears, that that's what he did exactly (took him about a year) and his first salary was around 75k.

    Damn!

    Well, I guess, I just want to get your general opinion about this endeavor.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    Don't be finicky about the order of the steps, be willing to work fairly dilligently, and you ought to do just fine.

    A friend of mine immigrated from Moscow at about the same time, with a background in metal smithing and management. He had a degree from a technical institute in Moscow, and nothing more. We made a DBA of him in a few months, and now he owns his own business creating web shops for small businesses.

    There's an old saying that goes something like: "If you want to give God a good laugh, tell him your five year plan." Vitali did very little according to the timeline of his plan, and he had to constantly adjust it (he accomplished everything he expected to do in five years in less than two years). Put your plan together, but keep your goals foremost in your mind and learn to take advantage of the opportunities that the world gives you!

    -PatP

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Phelan
    Don't be finicky about the order of the steps, be willing to work fairly dilligently, and you ought to do just fine.

    A friend of mine immigrated from Moscow at about the same time, with a background in metal smithing and management. He had a degree from a technical institute in Moscow, and nothing more. We made a DBA of him in a few months, and now he owns his own business creating web shops for small businesses.

    There's an old saying that goes something like: "If you want to give God a good laugh, tell him your five year plan." Vitali did very little according to the timeline of his plan, and he had to constantly adjust it (he accomplished everything he expected to do in five years in less than two years). Put your plan together, but keep your goals foremost in your mind and learn to take advantage of the opportunities that the world gives you!

    -PatP

    Thank you for your reply. I understand, that life is unpredictable and my plans might not work as desired, but still I need some kind of direction to go to . I am at ground zero right now. So, getting certifications and looking for a entry level IT jobs will go simultaneously, but certification will take priority, cause that's the only way to get a better job.

    Since you were so kind to participate, can I ask you this? Imagine yourself in my situation right now. With what you already know about the industry, how would you go about getting in?

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    First, I'd take stock of what assets I have now. What relationships do I have, what have I done, what can I clearly demonstrate. I'd rank those assets according to how I value them, and this is the list that I'd use to moderate my plans... Working toward what you think are your strengths is easy, but a trap. I'd re-rank those assets according to how an employer would value them (getting assistance from a third party helps immensely here), and use this list to promote myself (while keeping the first list firmly in mind).

    A great deal of the details depend on far more information than what we've exchanged so far. Dependants make a world of difference. Prior commitments may limit (or enhance) some opportunities. Only you can put those things into perspective.

    Find someone that you know and trust that is successful in your eyes. Talk with them. You are planning an important period in your life, quite possibly the single most important period that you can directly control. You need a kind of help that only a close friend can offer, someone that knows you and your values. This isn't the kind of advice you can get from a casual acquaintance on the internet.

    If I can help you, I will. I will not knowingly give you bad advice, but right now trying to give you anything more detailed than what I've already done would almost certainly do more harm than good. You need someone that knows you much better than I do for the help you are seeking.

    -PatP

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