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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    29

    Nornalization and Functional dependancy

    What is the difference between 1NF ,2NF,and 3NF?? can someone explain with examples??

    and what about the partial dependency and the transative dependency?? what are the difference?
    Thank you

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
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    What kind of class are you taking? Like many fields, the teacher will (and should) expect different answers from a survey-class student, a student that is focused on a technology (if it is part of their major), and a professional. The answers that you get here will probably be professional, so they won't be suitable for handing in as though you'd written them yourself.

    -PatP

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    29
    The course that am taking is DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    20,002
    does that course not recommend any textbooks that you should read?

    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
    Buy my SitePoint book: Simply SQL

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    29
    Ofcourse it does!!
    If I understood it then I wouldnt be asking for help....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    20,002
    do you mind if i ask which textbook it is?

    also, have you tried googling? there are hunnerts of web sites that explain 1NF, 2NF, 3NF...
    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
    Buy my SitePoint book: Simply SQL

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    29
    The book that we are using is called Database Systems Design,Implementation,And Management
    Seventh Edition
    Peter Rob , Carlos Coronel

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Try looking at the Wikipedia for understanding normalization concepts.

    -PatP

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    11,434
    Even wikipedia gives you a decent start... But you're not allowed to cite wikipedia any more are you?

    EDIT: I really should have refreshed the page before responding, eh ;-)
    George
    Home | Blog

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