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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    22

    Unanswered: Which is the best database around ?

    We have been using ms sql 2000 For a while now and want to migrate to a more robust database.

    how do the other databaess compare ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    on the wrong server
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    8,835
    Provided Answers: 6
    define robust? 2000 was pretty robust. what are you looking for?
    “If one brings so much courage to this world the world has to kill them or break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” Earnest Hemingway, A Farewell To Arms.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    22
    in comparison to the others ?

    a lot of people complain about windows and bugs ?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    22

    Am new to databases

    Hello,
    Am new to databases, which is the best way to go ?

    I have worked with mysql and ms sql 2000. But took a long break

    Now am back, am wondering which database is best suited for today's enterprise market ?

    Most people seem to like oracle and db2, but ms sql seems to have the best support

    pls advice

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    11,434
    Provided Answers: 10
    I don't

    You're asking in a Microsoft SQL Server thread - what responses are you expecting to recieve?
    George
    Home | Blog

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    22
    Well am pro ms, but hear a couple of negative reviews from friends

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    12,592
    Provided Answers: 1
    Try this search on google: "[your database engine or software of choice] sucks".
    Please let us know which ones return zero hits.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    22
    I would prefer to get advice from individual users

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    One Flump in One Place
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    14,912
    Merged threads - sallymac, you are posting like a blunderbuss ATM. Try at least not to duplicate your questions.
    Testimonial:
    pootle flump
    ur codings are working excelent.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    22
    sorry, maybe i should go for classes

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    One Flump in One Place
    Posts
    14,912
    Your questions are a mix of really general and really specific. What's your background? Have you inherited some databases or something?
    Testimonial:
    pootle flump
    ur codings are working excelent.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    UK
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    11,434
    Provided Answers: 10
    Quote Originally Posted by sallymac
    Well am pro ms, but hear a couple of negative reviews from friends
    Like what exactly?

    Basically, you need to analyse your needs and budget before you consider vendor.
    George
    Home | Blog

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    204
    Here is a previous reply from a similar question:

    http://www.dbforums.com/showpost.php...52&postcount=6

    Hope this helps ......

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,799
    Provided Answers: 11
    I can break SQL Server with just a few queries. I can break Oracle with just a few queries as well. I have never used MySQL, or DB2, but I am confident I can break them too. The trick is not how a person can fail, it is how able they are to take advantage of whatever features are included in the given software. Many of the people who complain about a database platform usually have some failure in their past. Usually it involves attempting to improperly transfer a database from one RDBMS engine to another.

    For example, Cursors in Oracle are fine. You use them almost everywhere. If you try to suggest a cursor in MS SQL Server, you will be booed out of the room by anyone who has any significant experience with MS SQL Server.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    12,592
    Provided Answers: 1
    Define "break".
    Overload?
    Generate an error?
    Generate incorrect results or corrupted data?
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

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