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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    178

    Unanswered: convert access 2000 to sql

    is microsoft sql easy to learn. my data base is getting slow and i was told i should convert to sql i can get microsoft sql.

    my database gets 3000 records a day everyday it has been running for 5 years.

    it is starting to get slow

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    How can we help then?

    is microsoft sql easy to learn
    No.
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Provided Answers: 8
    I was in the same boat

    all i did was backup database

    I did a upsize in msaccess to SQL followed the screens


    done.

    then you should be able the link front ends to the SQL data.
    hope this help

    See clear as mud


    StePhan McKillen
    the aim is store once, not store multiple times
    Remember... Optimize 'til you die!
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    MYLE
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  4. #4
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    Apr 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by StarTrekker
    is microsoft sql easy to learn
    No.
    it is too!
    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
    Buy my SitePoint book: Simply SQL

  5. #5
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    ▲ Nah-ah.

    Upsizing might move the data to the SQL Server, but that won't really speed things up if you have bound forms to tables with stax-o-data.
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
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    okay, maybe you're right, startrekker, sql server is hard to learn for access guys

    fortunately, not everyone suffers from that disadvantage

    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
    Buy my SitePoint book: Simply SQL

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    ▲ So logically, in an Access forum, the correct answer is NO.

    You can't win. SQL Server is hard to learn because so much of it is hidden. Just because you are an SQL Server PRO++++++ and YOU find it easy, doesn't mean anyone else in the entire world does. In fact, because you are so pro at it, it makes you the wrong person to ask
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Provided Answers: 10
    What's hidden in SQL Server exactly?
    George
    Home | Blog

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    I dunno, I haven't found it all yet.

    Sites like SQL Server Central shows me lots of things I have never seen in my day to day rummagings. There are acronyms indicating things exist and I have no idea what they are.
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Well if you ever need something demystifying, then just ask
    George
    Home | Blog

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    214

    Just an idea

    Do you need to have all 5 years of data available at once?
    I'm never a fan of deleting data, but you could do an archive of sorts.
    Take all of the data that you don't use that often (maybe anything older than 2 years) and export it out of the db as a csv. Then write some code to have handy to import the csv to run historical reports when you need it. Once the report is finished and you are done using it, delete that imported table.
    You know, I'm sick of following my dreams, man. I'm just going to ask where they're going and hook up with 'em later

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgev
    Well if you ever need something demystifying, then just ask
    Yes please. Just SQL Server will be fine ^^
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    178
    thanks for your replys

    there is only 4 forms that are bound to tables but these are only used once every 3or 6 months

    yes i need all the data i have setup an archive within the database and export it csv file.

    the reasion i am thinking microsoft sql is they want me to setup online access.

    this database sells tickets at a cinema now they want onling booking which i must admit i know nothing about. i also know nothing about sql either. so i am tring to find would it be easy for me to pick it up. when i started i knew nothing about access with help from you people i soon learned and my database has worked well.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
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    Everyone seems to have reservations about Microsoft SQL Server and rightly so. The history of the SQL language is that over the years the American National Standards Institiute (ANSI) has produced a number of standards for SQL. They have also licensed "extensions" which are additional features from different vendors. Some of these features have later been absorbed into the language proper. The problem is that Microsoft are control freaks and like to keep a lot of detail in their systems to themselves, to lock in the customers, so they have declined to allow their stuff to be closely scrutinised for standardisation. So long as you understand it, there is nothing wrong with SQL server per se, but really, it is only suitable for large enterprises with plenty of specialist support people hanging around.
    If you are going on-line, you might like to consider moving to a database which sticks closely to the standards and authorised extensions. One open source product is MySQL and a good proprietary one (which I believe is not unduly expensive) is Sybase. IBM has a product called Cloudscape, which i believe is freeware, but this is wrtten in Java. One of the real gurus, such as Startrekker, might be able to advise on whether Accss (on your desktop) can talk directly to these or other products. If not, I am sure that there will be VB or other .NET libraries available to facilitate this process.

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    I don't think you will find any/many of the the server db's are totally ANSI compliant. each vendor has some features which are not part of the ANSI spec.

    each has their own litle extensions and variations from standard SQL

    Each has their own little wrinkles and variations. providing you are aware of them, or you solely work within that brand of SQL it doesn't really matter that much which server product you use, assuming that you don't have to port SQL from one server to another.

    JET is one of the most non compliant products, SQL Server isn't that far from the standard (assuming you exclude the propriatory extensions).

    ultimately it doesn't matter one bit, youu use the weapon you have to to meet the current demands.

    Although SQL Server has been in Microsofts hands for a long long time now.. (is it 10 years?) it has its origins in Sybase.

    finding competant DBA's for SQL sevrer is easier than finding competant DBA's for MySQL
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

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