Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    Provided Answers: 54

    Unanswered: Learning Oracle independantly

    Ok, I haven't raised a ruckus in the Oracle forum for ages so its about time for me to start another brohouha or two...

    I've used Oracle on and off since 7.1. I've administered Oracle on Windows boxes, due to being a DBA and not having anyone else that could or would support Oracle within a given organization. I don't consider myself to be really proficient or technically adept, but I've always been adequate to the tasks that I've been assigned.

    I'm looking to increase my comfort level with 200 Gb and larger Oracle databases. We need both adminstrative and programming support (I won't be writing many applications, but I'll be supporting the SQL needs of the developers that do write them). Most of the machines I expect to support will be running on some variant of Microsoft Windows, although a significant minority will probably run on one of *ix variants.

    Keeping in mind that I'll be supporting multiple versions of Oracle, running from 7 through 11g. These databases will run on a variety of operating systems, including Windows, Linux, Unix, and quite possibly others. I'm confortable with administering machines running all of the opearting systems involved.

    Due to current staffing issues, off site training is nearly out of the question. Timing has to be flexible, since I'm on call nearly 24 by 365 until we get more staff (which should be Q1 2009). Given those constraints (which I'll conceed are nearly a worst-case scenario), what would you recommend I do to increase my comfort level with Oracle?

    -PatP

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    2,713

    Study at home?

    The person who says it can't be done should not interrupt the person doing it. -- Chinese proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    Provided Answers: 54
    I'd considered using Oracle's self-study CD-ROMs, but I see several problems with that approach. The problems include:

    No coverage for Oracle 7
    Significant repetition of material, with little or no highlighting of changes between versions.
    Very little coverage of cross-version problems (such as conflicts between listeners)
    No "overview" that was not version specific
    Completely Oracle-centric, the ROMs I've seen consider Oracle as the solution, not a component of a solution.

    Is there a better way to address these problems?

    -PatP

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    2,713

    Oracle 7,8,9?

    Forget Oracle 7, 8 and 9, concentrate on 10g and maybe 11g which cover the bulk of the material. You can always look-up the "New Features Guide" for the differences.
    The person who says it can't be done should not interrupt the person doing it. -- Chinese proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    Provided Answers: 54
    That sounds like as good an answer as I can get. If I was doing new development, I'd be 100% in favor of it. The problem is that I'm a consultant, and I need to support what the client has, not evangelize what the vendor wants to sell or what I'd prefer to support.

    -PatP

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,171
    Provided Answers: 1
    Have a look at the Oracle Concepts manual to get an overview of how it all works. Also, I'd recommend Tom Kyte's books (Expert One-on-One Oracle is one) and his Asktom website.

    As for your concerns about "evangelizing", it's hard to avoid getting some of that thrown in with the useful knowledge, since the Oracle docs, books and training tend to be written by people who know Oracle better than anything else!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    Provided Answers: 54
    Great heavens Tony!

    It's pub-thirty on Friday. What are you doing on DBForums man? Get your priorities straight!

    -PatP

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,171
    Provided Answers: 1
    Funny you should mention that. I am going to visit some friends tonight and I made the mistake of deciding to go straight from work. That means I'm stuck here till 6pm - hence the high level of dbforum activity from me today!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    Provided Answers: 54
    If you leave right now and work dilligently, you can be glorioiusly sloshed by the time your friends arrive. Since they will just be walking in, they'll be in fine shape to take care of getting you home safely. What a plan!

    Based on looking for "broad exposure" as opposed to specific information, I think that the Oracle 10g Complete Self-Study CD Course looks like the best choice available. Most of the servers I expect to support are running older versions than that. The CD selection for 11g looks very sparse. I'd appreciate any comments you can offer on that analysis, especially if I have missed something you consider important.

    On a (very slightly) more serious note, thanks for your comments and those of LKBrwn_DBA. Sometimes it can be challenging to sort out the wheat from the chaff when it comes to training, especially when you've been using a product for years but have never really focused much time/energy/money on it. I've used Oracle peripherally for years, but it looks like I may be both administering and assisting developers on an appreciable number of Oracle servers in the near future.

    -PatP

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,800
    Provided Answers: 11
    Like SQL Server, many of the base concepts in Oracle have not changed in a while. Blocks are still blocks, tablespaces are still tablespaces. If you have already gotten past the whole redo log/rollback segment difference, then you should be all set (although Rollback Segment has now morphed into Undo Tablespace since about 9i, I think). Most training will put you in good stead for a variety of versions. For the Oracle 7 database(s), you may just have to put up with less fancy tools.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    5,516
    Provided Answers: 1
    Take a look at this book
    http://www.amazon.com/Portable-DBA-R...7295598&sr=8-1

    It's like a 500 page cheat sheet, giving all sorts of practical information organized by tasks. In particular, it shows differences between Oracle versions where applicable. My background is primarily with DB2, and I find this book quite useful when I have to take care of an odd Oracle system.
    ---
    "It does not work" is not a valid problem statement.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •