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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    201

    Unanswered: Blank Pages When Printing Report

    Hello again, Colleagues All,

    Another teasing problem (well, it is for this bear of little brain) on which I invite your expert attention.

    One of my clients has a report which prints a page and then follows it with three blank pages. This pattern is also followed when printing in batch mode.

    I checked the page setup and it is regular A4. My next thought was that it might be spilling over into adjoining sheets, say 4 down and 1 across or 2 down and 2 across (a la Excel), so I used the Analyser to dump the properties for the report. Some of the values look odd and might support my thesis, but I do not know what units they are in. They are:

    Window Width: 15480
    Window Height 9795
    Window Left: -90
    Window Top: -375
    Column: 17.397 x 23.296
    Width: 9864
    Logical Page Width: 9636

    Can anyone explain to me the significance of these numbers and, if they are relevant, how they can be edited.

    Of course, any solution, not involving these, would equally be gratefully received.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,191
    I'm thinking those numbers are probably given in twips, which are the default unit in the code. I'm guessing what's probably happening with the extra paper is that the width of the report plus the left and right margins is adding up to be more than the width of the paper, which causes (as you suspected) the printer to print extra sheets. At least, this is usually the cause when I get a similar problem.

    Let us know if this helps or doesn't. Cheers.
    Me.Geek = True

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    1,004

    Talking

    Hi Jim,

    Yes, this happened to me also. You just need to modify your Report Width just a tad and the Length and see how that works. You might have something that bleeds outside of your margins just enough to add an extra page or more. Modify it just a little at a time. Sometimes it's just a very tiny incremental move that will make all the difference.

    Have a nice one,
    BUD

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    201
    I was afraid someone would say that, Bud. This report (not written by me) has a very complex header with a number of subforms and other fields superimposed one upon the other. These are turned off and on by VBA code according to cirumstances. What I do to see the underlying stuff is to start from the most exposed one and add a specified number of centimetres to its Top property and repeat the exercise until I have them all spread out on the page. Then I have to modify one Top property by a small amount (as you suggest) and then subtract the correct number of centimetres from all of the Top properties again to put it all together. Unfortunately, there is no way I can get my (otherwise very valued) client to believe that it takes so much time to solve an apparently simple problem !

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    out on a limb
    Posts
    13,692
    Provided Answers: 59
    check the report(s) you most recently changed to see if the report width has inadvertently changed
    make sure all sub reports are less than (or equal to) the width of the main report, and the main report fits the printer size. it may upset the tree huggers that you are not using 'all' the paper width but it will print on virtually any printer. I tend to use 1 ... 1.5cm overall margins, even though many printers these days can address up to about 5mm margins

    always design your report for a little bit less than the maximum printing area of the printer
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    1,004
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Wright
    I was afraid someone would say that, Bud. This report (not written by me) has a very complex header with a number of subforms and other fields superimposed one upon the other. These are turned off and on by VBA code according to cirumstances. What I do to see the underlying stuff is to start from the most exposed one and add a specified number of centimetres to its Top property and repeat the exercise until I have them all spread out on the page. Then I have to modify one Top property by a small amount (as you suggest) and then subtract the correct number of centimetres from all of the Top properties again to put it all together. Unfortunately, there is no way I can get my (otherwise very valued) client to believe that it takes so much time to solve an apparently simple problem !
    Hi again Jim,

    Can't you get to the ReportDesign view? If so then just manually move each margin just a tad. Most likely the right margin, but try the right and bottom margins, then view it and see what you get. Other than that if you can maybe send a screenshot of the report in DesignView and maybe someone can possibly see from that. I take it you can't send the DB in itself. Or if you can make a copy of the database and then remove all pertinent info. in the copy and upload it here for us to maybe tinker with. Actually I can't think of much else to do without really seeing it. What I suggest before is the only thing I have don't to remedy that problem. But hey, there are some real good minds on here and someone will be able to assist, I'm almost certain.

    Bud

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    201
    Hello again, Colleagues All. I apologise for my neglect of the useful replies to my problem. I should explain that the database in question was commissioned 10 years ago by a community of businesses scattered all over Australia. While it reflects the business very well indeed, its implementation is truly dreadful. it is mostly unnormalised and much of the content is generated on the fly by 10s of 1000s of VBA code ! I would not inflict this on my worst enemy ! My absence is explained by the fact that one member of the community commissioned me to create a new database maintaining the workflow character of the original one, but redesigning the table architecture and thus reducing the clients dependence on programmer assistance. It is going into beta production next week. Meanwhile, I must keep my other clients happy until the new system has proved its worth when hopefully they will all buy into the new one. Thanks for reminding me, Bud, that the subforms also have their independent borders. More tedious investigation, but my back is broad!
    On a more general note, I might observe that I come from an enterprise level computing background, but am dealing with small businesses in my retirement. This new database has only a few more active data tables than the old one, but about 80 tables of metadata which drive the system and can be modified by the client to suit his rapidly evolving business requirements. If anyone is interested in discussions of this kind of design, I would be happy to engage with them either in this forum or privately.

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