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  1. #1
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    Question Unanswered: How to Change Oracle 10g Server Name

    We want to rebuild an Oracle Database 10.2.0.3 database server on separate hardware that has a different machine name, DNS name, and IP address so that both machines can be on the network at the same time. Eventually, the old hardware will be turned off, and the new hardware will need to assume the machine name, DNS name, and IP address of the old hardware. Ive been told that Oracle has a script that can change the server name information, but I have not been able to locate it.

    Questions:

    Can someone identify the download location of that script?

    Does anything else need fixed that the script does not fix?

  2. #2
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    Your question & solution are all Operating System related & have nothing to do with Oracle.
    How can we give OS commands when you decided we did not need to know OS name or version?
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by anacedent
    Your question & solution are all Operating System related & have nothing to do with Oracle.
    How can we give OS commands when you decided we did not need to know OS name or version?
    Thanks for your response, but I think you misunderstood my question. We are running Solaris 10, but I don't think my question centers on the Operating System.

    During database creation, Oracle automatically "hardcodes" the server name in a number of dbconsole properties files (for example, emoms.properties, emd.properties, and targets.xml). I am wondering if Oracle hardcodes the server name elsewhere too.

    Does an Oracle script exist that can sweep through the Oracle directories and update the server name in the various configuration files?

  4. #4
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    >Thanks for your response, but I think you misunderstood my question.
    Yes, I "misunderstood" you were concerned about dbconsole in your first post since it is now intuitively obvious dbconsole is/was your primary concern.

    Please realize that a host can respond "alias" host name.

    Enjoy!
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  5. #5
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    Can anyone else respond? anacedent and I are not communicating very well, and I do not want to start a flame war.

    I am concerned about any aspect of Oracle (not necessarily just dbconsole) that may not respond well to a new server name. I'm sure other sites have renamed servers before. I'm just interested in how other folks have done this successfully. What gotchas am I likely to find? How can I work around them?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by shew01
    We want to rebuild an Oracle Database 10.2.0.3 database server on separate hardware that has a different machine name, DNS name, and IP address so that both machines can be on the network at the same time. Eventually, the old hardware will be turned off, and the new hardware will need to assume the machine name, DNS name, and IP address of the old hardware. Ive been told that Oracle has a script that can change the server name information, but I have not been able to locate it.

    Questions:

    Can someone identify the download location of that script?

    Does anything else need fixed that the script does not fix?
    If I am not wrong you want clone your Database to different server right?
    If yes : you must be create a new control file for new server

    please read : Oracle DBA Quick Guide - Clone an Oracle database using a cold backup

    If No : I did not understand.

  7. #7
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    Oops! Maybe I'm just explaining this wrong... Let me try again. Sorry for the confusion. :-~

    We currently have SERVER_A with a database db1 on it. As time permits, we are slowly building SERVER_B to look like SERVER_A on Solaris 10. At some point we will go “live” with SERVER_B and retire SERVER_A, meaning that we want SERVER_B to “become” SERVER_A, including server name, DNS name, and IP address. In order to do that, we plan to:

    1) Install Oracle Database 10.2.0.1 and patch to 10.2.0.3 on SERVER_B (note that Oracle hardcodes "SERVER_B" in some of its dbconsole configuration files and possibly other files)
    2) Restore a db1 backup from SERVER_A to SERVER_B with RMAN
    3) Physically turn off SERVER_A
    4) Reassign the old SERVER_A IP address to SERVER_B
    5) Rename SERVER_B to SERVER_A
    6) Verify that DNS works properly

    At this point, the "new" SERVER_A will have "SERVER_B" hardcoded in:

    1) listener.ora
    2) tnsnames.ora
    3) Possibly sqlnet.ora
    4) Some of the dbconsole configuration files (i.e., emoms.properties, emd.properties, and targets.xml)
    5) Possibly in other places of which I am unaware

    Does this list include all the objects that need to be changed in order to rename SERVER_B to SERVER_A?
    Last edited by shew01; 06-08-09 at 16:14.

  8. #8
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    Never confuse movement with progress.
    Going around in circle is movement, but some/many/most folks do not consider it to be progress.

    Please step back & cogitate on the following.
    I contend the only change that is required is to tnsnames.ora at time of switchover.

    The way I have done it many times in the past is to have both PROD & PROD_NEW alias in tnsnames.ora; which allows access & testing of new system while old (PROD) continues to run.

    At the moment of switch over you either switch alias names or switch hostname for the pair.
    SQL*Net does everying via tnsnames & the alias within.
    Nobody really cares about hostname or IP#, as long as SQL*Net connect to desired host.

    The more you change, the greater the chance for an error.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

  9. #9
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    Hello

    I assume you tryi building a loadbalancing/cluster structure.I think Oracle has solutions for such kind of purposes.Instead of creating something manually you can search oracle website.

    Best Regards
    Quote Originally Posted by shew01
    We want to rebuild an Oracle Database 10.2.0.3 database server on separate hardware that has a different machine name, DNS name, and IP address so that both machines can be on the network at the same time. Eventually, the old hardware will be turned off, and the new hardware will need to assume the machine name, DNS name, and IP address of the old hardware. Ive been told that Oracle has a script that can change the server name information, but I have not been able to locate it.

    Questions:

    Can someone identify the download location of that script?

    Does anything else need fixed that the script does not fix?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by anacedent
    I contend the only change that is required is to tnsnames.ora at time of switchover.
    Under normal circumstances (i.e., at most sites for which I have worked), I would agree with you. However, this site, for whatever reason, is extremely fond of hardcoded IP addresses for some applications, and changing the server name causes issues for other applications. In this particular instance, we really need SERVER_B to "become" SERVER_A. Otherwise, we'll be debugging non-Oracle code for a long, long time.

    Lots of contractors have worked here (i.e., come and gone) over the years, there are external firewall issues for sftp, documentation is thin, and we may not even have all of the source code. Consequently, we want the hardware change to be absolutely as transparent to the 60+ applications as possible. This is less than an ideal situation, but we are trying to make the best of it and still service the customer's needs.
    Last edited by shew01; 06-09-09 at 09:46.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunsail
    I assume you tryi building a loadbalancing/cluster structure.
    Thanks for the response. Actually, we are just trying to swap out 8 or 9 year old hardware with new hardware without causing problems with ancient applications that have oddball requirements and little documentation.
    Last edited by shew01; 06-09-09 at 09:44.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by shew01
    Thanks for the response. Actually, we are just trying to swap out 8 or 9 year old hardware with new hardware without causing problems with ancient applications that have oddball requirements and little documentation.
    I met recently paper it was about dynamically moving data without breaking running applications.they used oracle streams for this.
    maybe this can give idea for your operation,maybe easier because you ll hande everyhing in the database.
    you can create a new db instance on other server,with oracle streams transfer everything.
    Best Regards

  13. #13
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    Will you install the OS and DB on SERVER_B without network connectivity?

    I this case, you can configure the new SERVER_B as a mirror of SERVER_A... with the same hostname, and static ip, and the same Oracle DB instance name... restore the backup... stop SERVER_A... start SERVER_B... and you are done. If SERVER_B is configured with exactly the same parameter values (IP, hostname, Oracle SID etc) then you shouldn't have any problem connecting to the SERVER_B from other apps...
    You even may use the same Physical Network Address (MAC), so the domain server would not reject the new server (if it is the case).

    Remember not to connect SERVER_B to the network unless SERVER_A is stopped, otherwise you will get some network conflicts...

    But, I would suggest investigate the solution using a loadbalancer... so you will have the IP address that you need to keep configured on the balancer and the balancer will help you switch smoothly from one server to an other (with no downtime... or at least very limited downtime)...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jovus
    Will you install the OS and DB on SERVER_B without network connectivity?
    Thanks for your input. SERVER_A and SERVER_B were both on the network (with individually assigned IP addresses) at the same time until the final cutover.

    For whatever reason, this discussion kept getting way more complicated than what we were trying to do. Here is a summary of how we completed this task in July.

    We had SERVER_A, running Solaris 8 on very old hardware, with an Oracle 10.2.0.3 database (db1) on it. As time permitted, we built SERVER_B on new hardware and Solaris 10 to look like SERVER_A. To go “live” with the new SERVER_B hardware and retire the old SERVER_A, meaning that SERVER_B “became” SERVER_A from an application perspective (in order to avoid having to make any application changes to point to a new server), including server name, DNS name, and IP address, we:

    1) Installed Oracle Database 10.2.0.1 and patched to 10.2.0.3 on SERVER_B (note that Oracle hardcodes "SERVER_B" in some of its dbconsole configuration files)
    2) Restored a db1 backup from SERVER_A to SERVER_B with RMAN
    3) Physically turned off SERVER_A
    4) Reassigned the old SERVER_A IP address to SERVER_B
    5) Renamed SERVER_B to SERVER_A at the Solaris level
    6) Verified that DNS worked properly

    This fouled up dbconsole because of the hardcoded server name in the configuration files. When we get a chance, we plan to drop dbconsole. For additional information, please see MetaLink Doc ID 278100.1, "How to Drop, Create and Recreate DB Control in a 10g Database." We did not see any other issues.

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