Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    103

    Unanswered: Qick Start ASP and MYSQL

    Hi:

    Given the advise from the MYSQL forum and the prevalent opinion that ASP.NET is the way to go, I have decided to go that way. I'll be building a database driven (seems backwards, we're driving a database), website (portion of a website) to replace my current Access database.

    I am looking for a good book or two, not fifty, on ASP.NET and MYSQL implementation. Can I get your recommendations on what will give me a quick start? Below are some of the objectives I hope to achieve:
    1) Security - I don't want any other application to be able to read/decode the database contents - I expect to have to use crypt or cryptblowfish on a number of the fields. (I would have build my own encoding method, and would consider that if someone said that these could be decoded by others - I'll need to understand more about "salt" and whatnot, how this works before deciding).
    2) User level authentication and form availability based on the user type.
    3) Admin forms for managing the users and their access.
    4) Hopefully achieving the same type of reporting and querying available in Access - at least a full understanding of how to create joins in queries etc.
    5) Compiled code so that user's can't read through my web pages and figure out how to get into and read the data.

    I'm sure there is a lot more, I'll actually be building a service management type of database which includes contacts, companies, equipment, contract management, and the like . . . so it needs to be secure, but because there is utility in having customer's see certain data, I want to create a kind of "front office functions" and "back office functions" usage based on the user level/type.

    I am hoping this is not too much to tackle, I know how to do this in Access, except the whole web part, so as I thought it through, I felt it made more sense to just go ahead and build it on a web site. Although, if someone has a better idea, I'm all for that as well. Of course I am not a true programmer, and the concept of an IIS server and opening our network (even certain portions of it) to the world makes me more uncomfortable then creating a secure database on the internet - assuming that's a real possibility.

    Thanks in advance for your help in finding a book or two to get me launched.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    The Bottom of The Barrel
    Posts
    6,102
    Provided Answers: 1
    One of the chief tenets of ASP.NET is the ability to abstract your application away from your database. It will also represent your biggest learning curve. That said, I'd say focus on just .NET for the moment. The difference between interacting with Access or MySQL from .NET is minimal, so you shouldn't have too many problems once you have your feet wet.

    I'd recommend this as your first stop:

    http://www.asp.net/learn
    oh yeah... documentation... I have heard of that.

    *** What Do You Want In The MS Access Forum? ***

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    103

    While I am waiting for VS2008

    So, I'm waiting for my upgrade to 2008, afraid to install the trial in case it messes up the whole "upgrade" registration. I had to go through some hoops to install my VS2005 for office because I have office 2007, so I really don't want to mess with this. Anyway, my 2005 version does not include ASP.Net, so . . .

    I've been watching the videos on The Official Microsoft ASP.NET Site, there is good stuff there, but it's interesting that he's working with local copies of sql. I am wondering about working with mysql on the internet while I develop, and then publishing the application on the web site - hopefully moving it over won't cause any problems, and hopefully I can attache to a web database from my local computer while developing. Can you comment on that?

    Also, can you comment on the ability to compile the code so that what you publish will not allow the users to look at what you are doing? That's always scared me about web pages, but I know there has to be some way to do that so all they can see if they saw code would be the code to display the data?

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    The Bottom of The Barrel
    Posts
    6,102
    Provided Answers: 1
    ASP.NET is not an office product...

    Grab this: Visual Web Developer 2008 Express Edition


    As far as local vs. remote database stuff, I generally work with a local copy of whatever database I'm using, and then recreate on production once it's time to deploy. Many webhosts won't allow you to use their databases remotely anyway. They usually accomplish this by stating that any incoming requests for data MUST originate from one of THEIR servers (specifically meaning not your local computer).

    If you're working with MySQL, there are several utilities available that will create backup scripts allowing you to create a full copy of your development database out on our production deployment server. I'd go that route.

    As far as compiling code... There are several ways to bundle your custom code in ASP.NET. None of them are absolutely bulletproof, but some of them at least require more effort to reverse engineer than others. In general, the web server will not allow users to view the actual source of your web page. Any attempts to load http://yoursite.com/AnyFileThatEndsWith.aspx will be first passed to the ASP.NET runtime for execution before being returned to the browser. You still run the risk of someone rooting your ftp server and getting the original source code, but that's going to be a problem with just about any web development language. ASP.NET also gives you the ability to wrap up a lot of your business objects into pre-compiled assemblies (dll's) that make it much more difficult to see the actual code, though not impossible.

    You should be able to find some documentation on all these deployment approaches in the asp.net/learn site. They have some good stuff there.
    oh yeah... documentation... I have heard of that.

    *** What Do You Want In The MS Access Forum? ***

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by Teddy
    ASP.NET is not an office product...

    Grab this: Visual Web Developer 2008 Express Edition


    As far as local vs. remote database stuff, I generally work with a local copy of whatever database I'm using, and then recreate on production once it's time to deploy. Many webhosts won't allow you to use their databases remotely anyway. They usually accomplish this by stating that any incoming requests for data MUST originate from one of THEIR servers (specifically meaning not your local computer).

    If you're working with MySQL, there are several utilities available that will create backup scripts allowing you to create a full copy of your development database out on our production deployment server. I'd go that route.

    As far as compiling code... There are several ways to bundle your custom code in ASP.NET. None of them are absolutely bulletproof, but some of them at least require more effort to reverse engineer than others. In general, the web server will not allow users to view the actual source of your web page. Any attempts to load http://yoursite.com/AnyFileThatEndsWith.aspx will be first passed to the ASP.NET runtime for execution before being returned to the browser. You still run the risk of someone rooting your ftp server and getting the original source code, but that's going to be a problem with just about any web development language. ASP.NET also gives you the ability to wrap up a lot of your business objects into pre-compiled assemblies (dll's) that make it much more difficult to see the actual code, though not impossible.

    You should be able to find some documentation on all these deployment approaches in the asp.net/learn site. They have some good stuff there.

    Thanks, that's helpful. I think I have a general idea of where to go from here. The only thing that's got me worried is the connection string to MySQL which would be different from a local machine to that when it's actually on the web site. That, and moving data into the tables on the web site, but for that I am assuming I can export to excel, copy the excel files to the web site and then populate via queries right from the web site - presumably using queries I write in my application during my testing anyway . . . Will there be any trick to the connection? I am worried about investing a lot of time and then not being able to actually migrate over if you will.

    Thanks for everything you've posted thus far.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    The Bottom of The Barrel
    Posts
    6,102
    Provided Answers: 1
    Yes, you will have a different connection string on production vs. development. This is a very good thing, embrace it! All you need to worry about is making sure your web.config on production is pointing to the right place. You should be making a few changes to web.config before deploying anyway. Things like customErrors and debug generally need a quick glance since they are generally configured differently on a dev server vs. a prod server (customErrors generally needs to be turned on, and debug needs to be turned off). By making your web.config drive where your application looks for data, you insulate your code from changing databases on the fly. It's a good thing and you will come to like it, trust me.

    MySQL backup mechanisms tend to provide you with ways to include the data right in the script by creating a bunch of INSERT statements. PhpMyAdmin is one such tool that will do this for you. I believe MySQL Admin gives you that ability too, but don't quote me on it.
    oh yeah... documentation... I have heard of that.

    *** What Do You Want In The MS Access Forum? ***

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •