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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    48

    Question Unanswered: Users, Groups, Permissions in Access 2007

    I have administrator permissions on a database. I would like to add users and give them various levels of permissions. None of them should be able to make design changes. Some will be just using forms to view contents of tables. Others should be able to add or subtract parts (quantities) from inventory and/or add new parts to the inventory. I would also require that they have passwords different from mine.

    On the "Users and Permissions" tab of Database Tools I can pick "User and Group Permissions", "User and Group Accounts" or "User-Level Security Wizard".

    In "User and Group Permissions" if I pick my user name and an object name none of the Permissions check boxes are checked. This confuses me because I know I have permissions for all of the checkbox operations. If I look at the objects under the "Change Owner" tab, I see that the "Current Owner" for each object is unknown. I am not sure what, if anything, I should change here.

    In the "User and Group Accounts" it is easy for me to see what I can do and I don't have a question about this.

    Should I use the "User-Level Security Wizard" to set up permissions? I looks like a promising approach.

    As you can see from my questions, I have never before set Access permissions. Unfortunately, the Access help is woefully inadequate concerning permissions, and a Google search didn't help much either. I will appreciate any suggestions concerning this matter.

    Thanks,

    Charles

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    4,049
    Backup your database first. Lots of people have lost their databases by fiddling around with user-level security.

    You are NOT talking about Access 2007. Not the one I know anyway as it doesn't have user-level security nor a Database Tools menu.

    I personally don't bother with user-level security anymore, I just release mde's to those who can't make design changes and use either the windows login or my custom login to handle what users can and cannot do in the application.

    Keep looking for documentation before "fiddling" is my advice. And don't forget that backup!
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    48

    "Administer" database tool

    StarTrekker,

    I AM talking about Access 2007, but I have a version on my standalone computer (not on the Internet) that has the choices I mentioned. The version on my networked computer does not display an "Administer Database" tool having those choices. However both versions DO have a Database Tools tab. It is under that tab that the "Make MDE" button resides.

    So what is an MDE file?

    Charles

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    48
    StarTrekker,

    I AM talking about Access 2007 and it does have a Database Tools tab, in fact, that is where the Make MDB button resides. However, the version of Access 2007 on one of my computers does not have an "Administer" database tool that has the choices I mentioned.

    What is an MDE file? I assume such a file does not allow users to change the database design.

    Charles

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
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    Ah, you must have a database written in a previous version then.

    Access 2007 file format does NOT support user level security. Access 2007 supports it for older file formats so this must be what you have.

    MDEs cannot have forms, reports macros or modules designs viewed or altered. Actually I'm not sure about macros... I never use them either
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    48

    Right as Usual StarTrekker

    StarTrekker,

    Yes, the database was written in a earlier version of Access. I will likely go with the MDE file. I was hoping to limit permissions for certain types of documents. For example, only certain persons can close out an engineering change order.

    Anyway, thanks for your suggestion.

    Charles

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
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    4,049
    To handle that level of security, I either use the GetUser() function method (found in the code bank) or my own custom user logins. With either, you can map out which users can do what and then code your forms etc to suit.
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    4,049
    Oh... AS WELL AS using MDE files. Basically for me, MDEs are a given -- I never release MDB files into the wild
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    48
    StarTrekker,

    Thanks, I'm going to try the GetUser() function and the other ideas in that section of the code bank.

    Charles

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    4,049
    Good luck
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

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