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  1. #1
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    Unanswered: Access 2007 Security Warnings

    Hi

    Just want confirmation - this stupid ****ing disabling of code: As a developer I can do nothing about it? If I am distributing an app to clients it is up to them to handle this, either by clicking "Options" and "Enable Content" or by setting up trusted zones? I cannot do anything - I cannot override it, I cannot make the box more prominent\ modal, nothing?

    Worst case - if the user does enable code can I at least programmatically set up a trusted zone so they only have to enable the content once?

    Or is it as I suspect - me and the client are stuck with it?

    Ta
    poots
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    ur codings are working excelent.

  2. #2
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    dunno not had the need to dip my toes in Office 2007 waters
    would digital signatures help verify code.
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by healdem
    dunno not had the need to dip my toes in Office 2007 waters
    Some people are fortunate!

    Its pretty awful writing/maintaining code to run on both Office 2k3 and 2k7, with 'Ribbon' and no Toolbars, this is particulary true when the uninitiated with Office 2007 insist on saving Excel files as xlsx file which strips all the code !!

    As far as I can see there is no way round Pootle’s question (but I live in hope).

    In my opinion Office 2007 is (so far) the ultimate expression of Microsoft’s arrogance and complete disregard for their customers [end of rant].


    MTB

  4. #4
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by healdem
    dunno
    Another priceless post there I see Mark! I honestly don't know where I'd be without you guys
    Testimonial:
    pootle flump
    ur codings are working excelent.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTheBike
    Its pretty awful writing/maintaining code to run on both Office 2k3 and 2k7, with 'Ribbon' and no Toolbars, this is particulary true when the uninitiated with Office 2007 insist on saving Excel files as xlsx file which strips all the code !!
    Woah - it does what?

    Does anyone have any good references on differences developing between 2003 and 2007?
    Testimonial:
    pootle flump
    ur codings are working excelent.

  6. #6
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    Dunno either. And I agree with MTB!

    I just bloody well hope that Microsoft get their heads out of their asses and start listening to their customers and realise that not everyone is as super wealthy as they currently think -- not everyone can afford SQL Server and the .NET approach.
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  7. #7
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    Even with a stack of money and SQL server (been there, done that) ADO.NET is crappy... and Office 2007 does not smell any better!
    Have a nice day!

  8. #8
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    Yup... I much prefer Access 2003... the others just aren't even close imo. .NET has too much overhead and 2007 is just ... yeah... epic fail.

    It has taken the world 15 years to get really used to how things work in office... some of the more aged people it took a long time to get that far and with much effort. To expect everyone to just adapt to the new ribbon is just... to be frank... pissing them off. They all ask "why did they do it?" to which there is no good answer that they will accept.
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTheBike
    the uninitiated with Office 2007 insist on saving Excel files as xlsx file which strips all the code !!
    I've just tested this. So xlsx files cannot contain any code. Save an xls file as xlsx and you get prompted to strip out code or save as "macro enabled" file. Write code directly in an xlsx file and you get the same prompt.
    xlsm (macro enabled files) can contain code, but still have the code disabled by default.
    I think I will have to investigate digital signatures.

    My development playground of choice is .NET & SQL Server. That stack is free (for the basic\ express editions). Performance wise there is no comparison to that and Access and JET\ ACE (little experience of the latter)
    Testimonial:
    pootle flump
    ur codings are working excelent.

  10. #10
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    For me it's a matter of time. Even with a visual basic and SQL Server background, I'm finding .net a bit of a learning curve (especially when trying to convert my old vb apps to .net.)

    MSAccess 2007 is coming my way at work sometime next year so I don't have much choice in that regards.

    So far, testing a lot of our old MSAccess XP mdb files have been crashing left and right on MSAccess 2007 during the testing. (I believe it's having problems with the way the developer used the Filter and Search commands.) Not to mention a 1/2 dozen other possibilities. Although there's usually problems with any upsizing of MSAccess, 2007 actually 'destroyed' a few of the mdb files during testing (they were no longer usable in XP). I didn't design the apps so it's going to be challenging and it doesn't look pretty.
    Expert Database Programming
    MSAccess since 1.0, SQL Server since 6.5, Visual Basic (5.0, 6.0)

  11. #11
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    xlsx files can't contain code.

    *shakes head in utter amazement and disbelief *

    Where the hell is the brain of Microsoft? It seems to have "left the building".
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  12. #12
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    I bet this is XML's fault. I hate XML with a passion, I am convinced it is the worst thing to happen to computing since the birth of the PC.

    What is the benefit... I mean the REAL, TANGIBLE benefit?
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  13. #13
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    XML is fine - it is inappropriate use of it that is an issue.

    It is clear text readable - not proprietary, not binary etc
    It is a higher level descriptive format than JSON or key-value pairs
    Hierarchical data structures can be represented
    In the case of Office, I believe it meets a document format so is exchangeable across various programs (e.g. Open Office) though I'm not certain about this
    It is pretty fundamental to the semantic web (Tim Berners Lee loves it)

    It's great for exchanging data and a good form for "data" that does not belong in a database, such as documents. It all goes wrong when people start using XML in preference to RDBMS when the RDBMS is better suited.
    Testimonial:
    pootle flump
    ur codings are working excelent.

  14. #14
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    So no real tangible benefit then!
    Owner and Manager of
    CypherBYTE, Microsoft Access Development Specialists.
    Microsoft Access MCP.
    And all around nice guy!


    "Heck it's something understood by accountants ... so it can't be 'that' difficult..." -- Healdem
    "...teach a man to code and he'll be frustrated for life! " -- georgev

  15. #15
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    So how would you bulk transfer strongly typed, non-proprietary (consumer independent), constrained data across time zones?
    Testimonial:
    pootle flump
    ur codings are working excelent.

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