Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    12,592
    Provided Answers: 1

    Unanswered: Multiple virtualized SQL Servers

    Anybody have experience running multiple SQL Server instances in a virtualized environment?
    Performance hits, reliability, admin costs, etc?
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,800
    Provided Answers: 11
    we have been running some of our SQL Servers (mainly old ones) on a virtual environment. So long as someone is watching the virtual server software/platform, there is no increased admin overhead. You really can not tell if it is a virtual or physical box, unless you know where to look. Reliability has been good. The only real performance problems we had were tied to the cheap SAN that they gave us for a development environment. Monitors were timing out trying to connect to the SQL Server. Moving the VMs to the local disks resolved that, and hopefully a new SAN will be purchased to replace the POC SAN.

    Of course, these servers are only running in the range of 50 - 100 GB total of databases. Average database size somewhere around 2 - 5 gb depending on the server, and not a whole lot of traffic.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    5,516
    Provided Answers: 1
    Quote Originally Posted by blindman View Post
    Anybody have experience running multiple SQL Server instances in a virtualized environment?
    Performance hits, reliability, admin costs, etc?
    Reliability is about the same on VmWare. Admin costs are no different from the DBA point of view - you still have the same number of instance and databases to mess with. Sysadmins with VmWare/Hyper-V skills may cost more though.

    I/O performance is OK as long as you map each virtual drive that hosts SQL Server data and logs to a separate physical drive. If your 20 virtual servers will end up fighting for access to the same spindle, you won't be happy. Same for CPU - occasional spikes in CPU utilization get averaged out between multiple virtual servers; however, if some of the instances are CPU-bound, they may begin starving.

    As with any type of server, virtual machines are best suitable for hosting environments with uneven utilization and low to average performance requirements, such as development, functional testing, some intranet applications, proofs-of-concept etc.
    ---
    "It does not work" is not a valid problem statement.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    12,592
    Provided Answers: 1
    Fantastic info. Thanks guys.

    blindman
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •