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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    20

    Unanswered: Performance Issue - monitoring

    Windows Server 2003 DB2 9.5 8 gig memory - 300 gb of SAN disk.
    DB2 set up with automatic storage option.
    A Database with 5 Schemas holding many tables. Around 150 gig of data spread over the 5 Schemas.

    An outside source will acccess one schema to read data using ODBC connection.

    Processing on the database will be inserting and updating to 4 schemas and creating and inserting data into tables in the Schema
    for reading by the outside source.

    How do you monitor the performance impact of the outside source reading the schema tables?
    Would it be best to only allow the outside source reading when all inserting and updating on other schemas complete or would a
    seperate Database be better?

    Any other suggestions to lessen impact or improve performance - no money to improve hardware configuraton?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    4,292
    Provided Answers: 5
    Is it as 32bit or 64bit instance?

    I assume that the outside source will have a separate login to the database. Make sure that this has only select rights on the one schema only.

    How are they accessing the data? Do they write their own queries?

    Andy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    20
    It is a 32 bit instance.

    Yes they will be writing there own queries - only Selects.
    What do you mean by accessing the data - I thought ODBC would only look at the table schema defined?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    4,292
    Provided Answers: 5
    A 32bit instance means that 4 of your 8 GB of RAM is wasted. It cannot be addressed at all. And since windows will take up about half of the remaining 4, you have only 2 GB of usable memory. That could be a performance problem.

    What I meant by "How are the accessing the data" is if they were writing adhoc queries or are using some application or such with predefined queries. That is why I asked the second question.

    Since they are writing their own queries, you are basically at their mercy. If they write a totally horrendous query, you will have to suffer while it executes.

    Andy

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