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  1. #1
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    Unanswered: Using Oracle SQL Developer

    I recently had to switch from a Windows machine to a Mac so I also had to switch from PLSQL Developer from All Around Automations to SQL Developer from Oracle. It is definitely an inferior product, but for the most part I'm getting by.

    One thing that just drives me nuts though is that the query results tab is read only. Every other DB front end that I've ever used has had the ability to select and edit the results. From the documentation it looks like the way to edit data is to use the data tab of the table view. But it can't REALLY be so lame that it doesn't have a way to do this CAN IT? There's got to be something I'm missing. I tried selecting the rowid and ora_rowscn which is what the data tab uses when editing data, but still no joy. Does anyone know how to do this?

    Art

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    no offense but are you so lazy you cannot write an update statement?

    anyways.
    open a TABLE tab by cling a table.
    Click "Data" in the table tab.
    highlight the column-row you want to edit and start typing.
    click "commit" when done.

    This really is a piss poor way to update a row to be honest.
    The data in the window most likely won't show you the row you actually want to edit
    since it is about 20-50 rows long.

    I can't tell you how many devs I know have blocked/locked a damn table because they
    use SQL Developer and forget to click the "commit" button. Then they leave for the day
    and have left the stupid application open with transactions pending.
    - The_Duck
    you can lead someone to something but they will never learn anything ...

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Duck View Post
    no offense but are you so lazy you cannot write an update statement?
    I don't use SQL Devloper, but a similar tool and sometimes it's just a lot easier to do it directly inside the reuslt.
    Run a SELECT, see that a value is wrong, edit the value, save the changed value. Done.

    I can't tell you how many devs I know have blocked/locked a damn table because they use SQL Developer and forget to click the "commit" button. Then they leave for the day
    and have left the stupid application open with transactions pending.
    I agree, that is a stupid behaviour and if SQL Developer indeed locks the row when you start typing, I'd consider that as a bug....

  4. #4
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    no offense but are you so lazy you cannot write an update statement?
    I've got more productive ways to spend my time. Typically when this stuff comes up, its an interruption and I've got to run a query to verify what user x is complaining about. Now I've got the results right there in front of me and I want to edit one of them and get back to what I was doing before. Every other tool I've used lets you do that quickly.

    But SQL Developer's idea navigating to the schema then to the table, opening the data tab typing in a filter and possibly sorting to get back to the result set you already had, in order to edit... well that's just asinine. And it would be quicker to just write an update statement. Its so backwards that I'm thinking I missed something.
    Last edited by artacus72; 05-18-10 at 18:37.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    I am not a fan of SQL Developer per se.
    However, you get what you pay for.

    seems pretty fast to type it out to me.

    Code:
    select * from schema.table where x = 'y';
    
    update schema.table
    set z = 1
    where x = 'y';
    
    commit;
    - The_Duck
    you can lead someone to something but they will never learn anything ...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by artacus72 View Post
    But SQL Developer's idea navigating to the schema then to the table, opening the data tab typing in a filter and possibly sorting to get back to the result set you already had, in order to edit... well that's just asinine.
    Why don't you use another tool then?

  7. #7
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    Well as I said, my primary tool was PLSQL Developer. But it doesn't work on the Mac. SQL Developer is the only tool that I'm aware of that works on the Mac and works well with packages/debugging/code completion/etc. I've only been using it for a couple weeks. But if anyone knows of a good tool that works on Mac or Linux, I'd be open to that too.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by artacus72 View Post
    But if anyone knows of a good tool that works on Mac or Linux, I'd be open to that too.
    Any Java/JDBC based tool should work on Linux or Mac

    Here is a list
    http://java-source.net/open-source/sql-clients
    and here is another list:
    http://tinyurl.com/367o36n

    Most (all) of them are not Oracle specific, so if you need some very specific Oracle features (e.g. managing Oracle specific settings or features) you might need to stick with SQL Developer.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Or you could run a VM on your Mac and still continue using your old tool. I routinely use VMs at my work, and it allows me to keep using the tools I prefer and not have to worry about platform differences or having to learn a new tool that will impede my workflow.

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