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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    14

    Unanswered: 2 applications on the same Oracle

    Hi everybody

    I would like, if it is possible to have some advices about the instances and the databases on Oracle 10g.

    I would like to run on a server, only one server 2 applications using Oracle 10g as a database.

    inst 1: will be the first instance of the database1
    inst 2: will be after the instance of the database2

    So, after installing Oracle for the inst 1 with the database1, must we install also Oracle and after creating the inst 2 and the dataase2.

    Thank you in advance

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    Where the Surf Meets the Turf @Del Mar, CA
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    Provided Answers: 1
    If both instances are going to be the same version, only a single copy of Oracle s/w is required.

    Needless to say, if the 2 instances are to be different versions, then 2 different ORACLE_HOME are required
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Vienna, Austria
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    149
    pikhcom,

    correct me, if I'm wrong, but is it possible, you are using MS SQL Server terms ?
    Note, that most other DBs including Oracle use a different terminology (a constant source of misunderstanding, because the same words are used for different concepts):

    - what you may know as "server" is known as "database" in most other systems
    - your "Master database", is called "SYS - schema"
    - a MS "database" is called "schema"
    - a MS "cluster" is called "hot standby"
    (what is called "cluster" by Oracle is not available in SQL Server)

    As for "database" and "instance":

    Very roughly spoken: everything residing on disk is called "database", the stuff in memory is the "instance".

    I'm not a SQL Server expert myself, but let me try to translate:

    "Can one Oracle database have more than one schema ?"

    The answer is: Yes, Oracle 10gR2 supports up to 2,147,483,638 schemas.

    Before trying to do anything serious, however, you should at least read the Concepts Guide
    "There is always an easy solution to every problem - neat, plausible, and wrong."
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    14
    Dear all

    At least, I found the way and the answer of what I want and it was on configuration tools and migration > Database configuration > .. and there you can create it.

    Waiting for comment, thanks in advance

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    14
    You are right that I can make mistakes in terminology and can confuse it.

    But what is the best way on another case:

    Two applications App1 and App2
    Oracle 10g:

    with one database, one schema and two instances

    or

    with two databases, two instances and two schemas

    ??

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    4,094
    Provided Answers: 4
    Two schemas in a single database.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    14
    Can you advise on how to do it??

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Provided Answers: 4
    Create a database.

    Then create two users (a "user" in Oracle terminology equals "schema") using the CREATE USER command. Grant certain privileges to those users (so that you'd be able to connect to the database, create tables, views, other objects, ...).

    I think that, once you do that, you should create additional users for every application - possibly as many users as there are people who will be working on it. They should NOT have direct access to "original" schemas (the ones you created in a previous step), but you should grant privileges on every table, procedure, package, whatever they need to use. In order to simplify the process, use ROLES (you'd then grant privileges to a role, and then grant role to a user).

    We run MANY applications that connect to a single database which contains many schemas. I don't think that you should use two databases for (only) two applications (although that's OK if you find a good reason to do that. You never said what kind of applications they are).

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