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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Fort Worth, TX
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    Unanswered: Convert Database to SQL Server

    I have several databases that I have created that I want to change into SQL Server Databases. I am currently taking a Database Programming class and we are using SQL Server 2008 R2 with Visual Studio 2010.
    Is it possible to have databases that I have created in Access 07 converted into SQL Server DBases (with Forms working)

    New to SQL but learning pretty quickly and want the enterpise capability that it can offer.

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Richmond, Virginia USA
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    Not sure of the exact definition of "convert" you mean here, but it is common to use an Access front end, with its forms, queries and reports, with a SQL Server back end, holding the data tables.

    My work has never taken me down that route, but there are plenty of posters here who have and can help you with the specifics!

    Linq ;0)>
    Hope this helps!

    The problem with making anything foolproof...is that fools are so darn ingenious!

    All posts/responses based on Access 2003/2007

  3. #3
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    Dec 2004
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    What I am looking to do is have the entire database operate in SQL Server with Visual Studio creating the forms (if that is how it works) My Professor mentioned that Access is becoming obsolete and that SQL Server is a good step up.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Provided Answers: 14
    Transfering the tables from Access to a SQL server is rather easy and several tools are provided both in Access and in the SQL Server Management Studio. Queries should not be very difficult to re-create. For everything else (modules, forms, reports) you're on your own and you'll have to build everything from scratch (part of the VBA code can be converted to Visual Basic .Net, though).

    Saying that that Access is becoming obsolete does not mean a lot : Access 2010 will be supported until 13/10/2020 and the next version probably is already in preparation.

    MS SQL Server is in no case a replacement solution for MS Access. SQL Server is a step up for the Jet Engine and provides extended database functionalities (mainly storage and SQL language), but has almost nothing to offer in terms of end-users interface (forms, reports) and programming language (except for SQL). You need another product (Visual Studio .Net, Delphi, RAD Studio XE, etc.) to develop a functional end-user application.
    Have a nice day!

  5. #5
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    Dec 2004
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    Fort Worth, TX
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    I am wanting to build the end user application in Visual Studio, however is there a way to take what I have already created and use it in the Visual Studio software?

    I am looking for a better way to take my Dbase to the next level and allow it to support multiple users and be available online.

    Thank You for your info

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    No, there isn't. There is no direct upgrade path from Access forms and reports to .NET.
    oh yeah... documentation... I have heard of that.

    *** What Do You Want In The MS Access Forum? ***

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    ...but there is a route from Access/JET to MS SQL server... look at the upgrade wizard

    as Teddy points out you won't be able to move you UI but your existing Access app will happily 'talk' to SQL server. however a word of caution on using the upgrade wizard, used uncaringly you get the worst of both worlds, an access App that uses bound recordsets and local processing connected to a server db that has little or no improvement on JET.

    your professor needs to justify his assertion

    granted Access will be obsolescent someday, so will WIndows 7, Max whatever and almost certaily Linux.

    if I was worried about the obsolescence of a specific platform right now I'd probably look at a web interface, whether thats through a scripting language such as ASP/ASP.NET/PHP/Python or plain old vanilla CGI through PERL, or possibly through one of the new gizmos such as Ruby/RUby on Rails.
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    601
    I use this to upsize Access 2007 back ends to SS:

    SQL Server Migration Assistant 2008 for Access V4.0

    My Professor mentioned that Access is becoming obsolete and that SQL Server is a good step up.
    That's funny.

    If your Professor said that it is obvious the they know very little about Office/Access. Especially about the 2010 version.
    Boyd Trimmell aka HiTechCoach HiTechCoach.com (free access stuff)
    Microsoft MVP - Access Expert
    BPM/Accounting Systems/Inventory Control/CRM
    Programming: Nine different ways to do it right, a thousand ways to do it wrong.
    Binary--it's as easy as 1-10-11

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