Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2

    Question Unanswered: Remote control, parallel architecture and portability for a database?..

    I have to do a database project, and my first task is to make a analysis between some posibilities and to decide witch is the best to use in this case (I have to consider SQL Server, mySql, Oracle and DB2). So, my databse must permit remote control, must run on parallel architecture, must be portable and it has to work with signals(actually, it will be used for comparing some signals, to decide of what type a signal is). Of course, I must consider the others features of a database, too: like hardware/software requirements, security, backup, complexity of language..
    Another problem is that I dont't understand how does it work remote control, for example.. From what I've been studying, I understood that all of the database management systems that I'm considering allow remote control, but there are differences of implementation..And a have a problem with parallel architecture, too.. So, please, could you tell me your opinion?.. And I'll be greatfull if anyone could tell me the main advantages/disadvantages/other features regarding these database management systems.. Thanks a lot..

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Sebastian, Spain
    Posts
    880
    Hi,

    by remote control, I am assuming remote administration? All databases can be monitored and administered remotely. The bottleneck will be network access from wherever you are working remotely. If you are within an office LAN then all databases operate in client/server mode which allows access easily. From the Internet you will need to look at bypassing the firewall (which is not a good idea). With my clients I use Virtual Private Networks (VPN) to access their local LAN and from there perform the administration of the databases.

    Portability is a little more complex. Each database has its own way of doing things. If you are going to be used stored procedures then this will not be portable. If on the other hand you are simply writing SQL statements then I suggest using either ODBC or JDBC clients. Using either ODBC or JDBC clients allows to run SQL statements and by changing the ODBC client allows in most cases for the software to be portable. I stress most cases there are cases where it will not work. The downside of using this is performance. Each SQL statement will need to be sent across the network, which is slow, parsed and executed on the database server. Stored procedures means you simply transmit the procedure name with the data across the network and it executes it on the server. The stored procedure can execute multiple statements making them efficient. On commercial databases the stored procedures are compiled and stored for more efficient execution then on MySQL.

    I do not follow what you mean by signals. You will need to provide more information about that.

    All databases scale and work on multi CPU hosts. All databases also support security but again the security in question would be based on your requirements.
    Ronan Cashell
    Certified Oracle DBA/Certified MySQL Expert (DBA & Cluster DBA)
    http://www.it-iss.com
    Follow me on Twitter

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2
    Hi,

    Thanks for your answer. I don't know yet how it should be done the part with acoustic signals (how it must be transmitted and recognised the type of a signal). The main idea is that I must have a database where I have to store signals, types of signals and some features of them. And I must transmit a signal to the database to verify of what type it is, and if it isn't already stored, I must add it to the database..(the name of my project is "Development of a database application with parameters of acoustic signals"). I think that I could compare signals by frequency or maybe wavelenght, but I need to find out more about these things...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •