Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    31

    Unanswered: Form sizes in access 2007 and free text validation rules

    I have a problem saving the sizes of forms created in access 2007. I restrict the size of the form from the grid in design view and save it each time and have checked all possible combinations of properties and it still returns a full white form as seen in the attachment. Is this a glitch with access 2007? If not, then how can i go about resticting the size.

    Additionally, i have a field dependent on free text records from a table where people tend to have horrendous spelling which i would like to filter through matching to possible variations of spelling i am looking for...as standard practice a proper record would be where radiographers enter variations of Lumbar Spine X-Rays as either LSPINE, LUM SPINE, L SPINE, LUMBAR SPINE, LUMB, LSP, LSPN etc. But in some cases i've seen people spelling LUMBER SP, LYMBER, LBER etc. Is it possible to set up a like clause testing for key letters within the spelling?
    Ideally for this i would like to automatically change the names of these records to one set name. Theres the option of doing this manually but i'm working with datasets for tens of thousands of records, so perhaps a query to test and change these names to get a standardized name to account for variations would be best, how can i go about doing this if possible and if not what would you suggest?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails FormBeforeinDsgnView.png   FormAfterin FormView.png  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    London
    Posts
    341
    With the screen size, the main components seem to be;

    Format Tab;
    Auto Resize = No
    Fit to Screen = No

    Other Tab;
    Pop Up = Yes

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    out on a limb
    Posts
    13,692
    Provided Answers: 59
    for the lumbar spine issue then I'ds suggest you use a list or combo box which has the options built in, that way round you no longer have typos to deal with

    I thibnk Ive seen the form sizing behaviour before, check that the access application isn't maximised.
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by christyxo View Post
    With the screen size, the main components seem to be;

    Format Tab;
    Auto Resize = No
    Fit to Screen = No

    Other Tab;
    Pop Up = Yes
    Turns out when i was selecting the wrong control. The properties i was seeing were for 'Details' and not the 'Form', its sorted out now.
    Thanks

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by healdem View Post
    for the lumbar spine issue then I'ds suggest you use a list or combo box which has the options built in, that way round you no longer have typos to deal with

    I thibnk Ive seen the form sizing behaviour before, check that the access application isn't maximised.
    I was able to apply some criteria using wildcard characters to account for some of the variations of names used, but they are specific to 6 specific studies. How would i go about assigning an option in the list or combo box to account for all variations for each study?

    Initially, i thought about renaming the typos but i would prefer not to mess around with the original data, jus a matter of treating the variations the same way i would with correct entries under one central heading.

    So to be able to assign CHEST PA as a set name of exams and having all the variations from the raw data like CXR PA to be treated under the same heading.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia USA
    Posts
    2,763
    Provided Answers: 19
    I know you don't want to hear this, but I can tell you, from experience, that the only reasonable/accurate way of doing this is thru the use of Data Entry people.

    Just look at your example! You've got seven possible ways of saying Lumbar Spine, and that list probably doesn't cover all of the possibilities! Then you've got Cervical Spine, and Thoracic Spine, and Pelvic Films and so forth and so on! There are simply too many possibilities for too many procedures!

    I saw a team of six programmers spend three months trying to do something similar with addresses, trying to make the abbreviations used more uniform. After the three months they finally threw in the towel hired temps to do the conversion!

    Looking forward, for Records yet to be created, Paul's solution is the right idea. You can have a Combobox with the appropriate procedure names listed, and then have a hack to add the selected name to the end of the 'free text' control of the Current Record.

    Linq ;0)>
    Hope this helps!

    The problem with making anything foolproof...is that fools are so darn ingenious!

    All posts/responses based on Access 2003/2007

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by healdem View Post
    for the lumbar spine issue then I'ds suggest you use a list or combo box which has the options built in, that way round you no longer have typos to deal with

    I thibnk Ive seen the form sizing behaviour before, check that the access application isn't maximised.
    Initially i had used a Select Distinct clause for names of the different exams so that they could analyse any standardized examination but after seeing how crappy all the variations were i figured its not worth using. For the most part i currently am interested in six possible examinations and i will leave instructions on how to add more if they want to afterwards, but for now i think six queries...one for each variation of names should suffice.

    Also, I'm not sure if it can be done or how to do it, but can a list box or combo box of queries be made?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    London
    Posts
    341
    Quote Originally Posted by clownyj View Post
    Also, I'm not sure if it can be done or how to do it, but can a list box or combo box of queries be made?
    Code:
    SELECT MSysObjects.Name, MSysObjects.Type
    FROM MSysObjects
    WHERE (((MSysObjects.Type)=5) AND ((MSysObjects.Flags)<>3));

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Missinglinq View Post
    I know you don't want to hear this, but I can tell you, from experience, that the only reasonable/accurate way of doing this is thru the use of Data Entry people.

    Just look at your example! You've got seven possible ways of saying Lumbar Spine, and that list probably doesn't cover all of the possibilities! Then you've got Cervical Spine, and Thoracic Spine, and Pelvic Films and so forth and so on! There are simply too many possibilities for too many procedures!

    I saw a team of six programmers spend three months trying to do something similar with addresses, trying to make the abbreviations used more uniform. After the three months they finally threw in the towel hired temps to do the conversion!

    Looking forward, for Records yet to be created, Paul's solution is the right idea. You can have a Combobox with the appropriate procedure names listed, and then have a hack to add the selected name to the end of the 'free text' control of the Current Record.

    Linq ;0)>
    Its a good plan and i agree, but the issue is that the limitation is really the radiology information system they use to enter data, because that is where the input to my program comes from in the form of a spreadsheet exported from the RIS database and appended into a secondary database.

    Thats also where the use of free text fields for examination names stem from, were it not for that and there were set records that limited you to what was available from dropdown lists, it would be a breeze to use SELECT DISTINCT so that an audit could be carried out on any examination....but they want me to come up with some brilliant way of shifting through their rubbish data entries to still collect sufficient data to carry out an accurate dose audit which i'm just going to tell them is a limitation out of my control and i've done my best with what i've got.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    London
    Posts
    341
    Missinglinq is correct. The only real way you could do it is manual checks.

    If you rely on it being automated, you'd have to list every possible combination of mistake that someone could make for the system to compare, and then you would still need to manually check each entry anyway to avoid it changing entries to the wrong entry, or even changing correctly spelled words where it assumes they are wrong.

    For example, if you wrote the code to go and replace "LSP" with "LUMBAR SPINE"

    It would also change "LSPN" to "LUMBAR SPINEN"...

    You might want to consider forcing a spell check before saving a record. This 'should' help correct it...

    Spell Checking in an Access Form | Database Solutions for Microsoft Access | databasedev.co.uk




    NOTE: IGNORE ALL THE ABOVE... I didn't read the comment about it being an EXCEL import...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    41

    Displaying Form

    I think what you need to do to display the form as designed is to go to the Access Options under the Office thingee and then to Current Database and change the Document Windows option to Overlapping Windows. This worked for me.

    I tried to attach a pic of the access options page but never sure if these things work.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Access Options.png  

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •